background image
Creative Commons Copyright 2020 - Transition Towns Australian Inc 
background image
  www.transitionaustralia.net
Topic 
Date & time
Host 
Coordinator
1. Introduction
2. Water
3. Energy
4. Food
5. Transport
6. Waste
7. Wrap up
Name 
Phone
Email
Address 
Your Group’s Schedule 
and Contact Information 
page 2...
Licensed under Creative Commons - Conditions on page 31 
background image
Introduction
Transition believes that by coming together 
at local levels, we can:
reimagine and rebuild our world; 
rebuild a caring, connected culture; 
reconnect with nature; 
reclaim the economy; 
re-skill and reimagine work.
More about the Transition Movement can be found here
[1.1]
 - see back cover.
The program is based on seven group sessions. 
Five of these cover areas of our lifestyle where we can easily reduce energy use, and save money.
Session 1: Getting Started
Session 4: Water
Session 6 : Waste
Session 2: Energy
Session 5: Transport
Session 7: Next Steps
Session 3: Food
• Groups meet every 2-4 weeks for 2 hours having read the chapter for that session. Extension materials, 
practical action plans, and detailed background information is available online for each session.
• Transition is democratic and inclusive, so while each session requires a coordinator, a notetaker, and a 
timekeeper, these roles should be shared and rotated - for more support, comprehensive session facilitator 
guides can be found here 
[1.2]
• This first session is also about Healthy Groups - learning how to work well together. So before you start - 
read through, discuss, and agree on the group guidelines. 
• The program is about change - so discover where you stand now through one of the online  Global 
Footprint Quizzes 
[1.3]
  or the worksheet at the end of this session.
Group Guidelines
It is important to agree on some guidelines for how your group will work so it will be a more satisfactory 
experience for everyone. These agreements are in place to support the unity and stability of the group, and to 
create an atmosphere of mutual support and trust. It is important that all group members collectively agree to 
these at your first session. You may want to revisit them, and feel free to edit, adapt, or add to them as your 
group sees fit.
 
 
Session 1 - page 1
✔ Confidentiality: We agree to respect the 
privacy of any personal information shared at 
the meetings and we agree not to discuss 
this information outside the group in a way 
that would mean a person could be identified. 
The  program  in  this  workbook  has  been  developed  to 
help   you  start  that  rebuilding  beginning  with  simple, 
practical changes to your home and your habits. 
A  fun  journey   to  a  lower  energy,  less  resource 
consuming way  of life, that also helps you save money, 
reduce your  carbon  dioxide  (CO
2
) emissions,  and  help 
minimise  your  household’s reliance on  fossil  fuels, and 
as a bonus, improves your health.
✔ Respect: We will strive to ensure that time is 
shared equally between team members in terms of 
speaking and listening, and that differences of opinion 
are allowed and respected. Our abilities to change will 
vary, based on a variety of factors such as income or 
time, age or disability. 
✔ Punctuality: We agree to arrive on time 
for each session and to start promptly so that 
everyone can benefit from the full two hours. 
✔ Support: When possible, we will offer 
practical and emotional support to any 
team member who is experiencing 
difficulty in attending the sessions (or 
achieving the actions). 
✔ Commitment: We commit to attend all the sessions when possible, and to let 
the other group members know when we cannot. If someone is attending in our 
place, we will ensure  they know what’s been discussed previously. We also 
commit to have read the relevant workbook section before each session and be 
prepared to take some actions each time. 
background image
Session 1 : Getting Started
Item
Time
Read through, discuss, and agree on the group guidelines.
10 min
Introduce yourselves – who’s in your household, where you live and your situation; whether 
or not you or your household have explored sustainability issues before; why you’ve 
decided to participate in Transition Streets, and what you hope or expect to get out of it.
30 Min
Use the worksheet on Page 2 to plan your group schedule for discussion sessions — how 
often, where, and who will facilitate the discussion - also complete the contact details.
10 min
Share  the  results of your Global  Footprint Quizzes around the group and  note what areas 
you  want  to  work  on  or  learn  more  about  -  remember  the  Group  Guidelines  in  your 
discussion, this is the starting point of the journey.
30 min
Transition groups are great at helping people develop visions of the future they want, and 
then making possible the steps towards it. Take time now to imagine and describe some of 
those future worlds.
30 Min
Imaging the Future You Want To Create
Close your eyes and imagine walking down the street in 2030. 
Before you close Session 1, take time to reflect on how the session went, think of steps 
that might be taken in the next session, consider how the others are reacting and 
responding. Think Head, Hands, & Heart.
10 min 
 
 
Session 1 - page 2
Community Energy 
Power generation, and 
distribution, will be in community 
ownership, creating local jobs, 
energy equity, and reduced 
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Urban Agriculture:
Food will be grown closer to home, organically, in intensive 
systems that enhance biodiversity, and we’ll all have the skills to 
do it. It will change the way our towns and cities look and feel.
Cycling 
Part of global sustainable transport, 
learning bike repair skills, supporting new 
cyclists to gain confidence, developing 
CO2 free local distribution networks.
Water 
Cooperation between industry, agriculture, and urban 
infrastructure to harvest, preserve, and fairly distribute, fresh, 
clean water to communities in balance with the needs of the 
natural environment.
Waste 
Community networks to handle unwanted or surplus items in a circular 
fashion - refuse, reduce, reuse, repair, re-gift, recover, recycle - rethink.
Productive Trees:
In the future, why would we plant ornamental, unproductive trees, 
when we could plant fruit or nut trees? Let’s reimagine our towns 
and cities as food forests.
Neighborhoods 
Planning and decisions made in a decentralised, engaged, bottom-up way, 
with the role of government being to support what communities are deciding. 
Networks that share skills, information, and tasks, so everyone is both 
supported and enabled to give back.
background image
Circle your answer and then add up your score for each section - fill in the total on page 2
Food
1. ___of my food is packaged
2. I waste __ of my food each day
3. __of my food is processed
4. I compost my vegetables & fruit
5. __of my food is grown locally
6. Each week I eat meat___
Water
1. Shower or bath___minutes
2. Flush the toilet ____ time
3. Brush teeth with tap left___
4. Have Low Flush Toilet
5. Have Low Flow Shower & Taps
Energy Use
1. Winter Thermostat set on___
2. Use a dishwasher 
3. LED lights 
4. Energy Efficient Appliances
5. Leave and Turn off TV & Lights
Shelter
1. My house is a____
2. Our second home is____
3. Rooms per person
Transportation
1. Have __cars for each driver
2. Time we use the car__
3. To school / work by car
4. Car Size 
5. Each year I fly___times
All [100]
Most [75]
Half [50]
Some [25]
None [0]
All [100]
Most [75]
Half [50]
Some [25]
None [0]
All [100]
Most [75]
Half [50]
Some [25]
None [0]
All [100]
Most [75]
Half [50]
Some [25]
None [0]
All [100]
Most [75]
Half [50]
Some [25]
None [0]
More than 7 
times [600]
Each Day 
[400]
A Few Times 
[300]
Eggs/Dairy 
only [200]
None [0]
> 10 [200]
10 [100]
4 or less [50] flannel [25]
None [0]
Every [50]
Half [25]
On [50]
Off [25]
No [50]
Yes [ 
-50
]
No [50]
Yes [ 
-50
]
> 23 [150]
18-21 [100]
18 or less [ 
-25
]
Often [100]
Sometimes [50]
Never [ 
-50
]
None [50]
Some [25]
All [ 
-50
]
None [50]
Some [25]
All [ 
-50
]
No [50]
Maybe [25]
Yes [ 
-50
]
big block [50]
small block [25]
terrace [0]
apartment [ 
-50
]
Holiday [400]
Rental [200]
None [0]
> 3 [200]
2-3  [100]
1-2 [100]
One [ 
-50
]
2+ [200]
One [100]
Half [0]
None  [ 
-25
]
Hour+ [200]
30-60 min [100] 0-30 min [50]
None [0]
Alone [200
Shared [100]
Bus etc. [25]
Walk Bike [0]
SUV [200]
Sedan [100]
City [50]
None  [ 
-25]
2+ [400]
1-2 [200]
None [0]
Session 1 - page 3
Footprint - Page 1
My Ecological Footprint
background image
Goods & Services
1. New set of clean clothes each day
2. Wear clothes that have been mended
3. My clothes are always new
4. I donate surplus clothes 
5. __% of my clothes are never used
6. __ pairs of new shoes each year
7. __ electronic devices at home
Waste
1. All my garbage would be ___litres
2. Recycle paper cans glass & plastic
3. Clean & reuse things many times
4. Repair things when possible
5. Always bring my own bags
6. Shop online ___ times a year
Add Up your Scores  -----    Total / 300 = Earths    -----    Earths x 2 = (global)Hectares
County
H
R
County
H
R
County
H
R
Australia*
6.6
5.7
USA
8.1
(-4.5)
Canada*
7.7
7.4
France
4.4
(-2.4)
Japan
4.5
(-3.9)
China
3.6
(-2.6)
Brazil*
2.8
5.9
Indonesia
1.7
(-0.4)
Kenya
1.0
(-0.5)
This chart shows the 2016  data, the H global hectares footprint per  person, but the R global hectares shows 
what bio-capacity  is still available, and except for  the large open countries (*) we are already  in deficit in every 
part of the world.
This worksheet is based on the Conservation Station worksheet, 
and data from Open Data Platform [data.footprintnetwork.org]  more here [1.3]
including information on the Overshoot Day - the day in the year when we start 
“eating” the Earth.
Several [100]
Once a day [50] Sometimes [0]
No [0]
Yes [ 
-20
]
Yes [200]
Some [25]
No [ 
-50
]
No [100]
Some [25]
All [ 
-50
]
75% [100]
50% [75]
25% [50]
7+  [100]
3-6 [75]
0-2 [25]
15+ [200]
10-15 [100]
5-10 [75]
100 [100]
50 [50]
15 [25]
None [ 
-50
]
None [200]
Some [100]
Half [50]
All [ 
-100
]
No [25]
Yes [ 
-25
]
No [25]
Yes [ 
-25
]
No [25]
Yes [0]
Make them [
-25
]
Make them [
-25
]
15+  [200]
10-15 [100]
5-10 [50]
0-5 [25]
Session 1 - page 4
Food
Water
Energy
Shelter
Transport
Goods
Waste
Total
Earths
Hectares
Footprint - Page 2
My Ecological Footprint
background image
Session 2 : Energy
In this session we look at use of electricity, gas and renewable energy.
Demand for energy continues to grow faster than the world's population due to:
• rising living standards and increasing energy demands in developing countries, 
• increased heating and cooling in all countries due to climate instability, and 
• the surge in electricity powered technologies.
Fossil fuels ( coal, oil, and gas ) still dominate electricity generation, and these are becoming even higher CO2 
emission industries as the accessible mining sources run out, and as bulk export and shipping of natural gas 
expands globally.
Nationally, 81% of our electricity is produced from coal or gas, and 19% from renewable sources - a third each 
from wind, hydro, and roof top solar (2019). The mix varies by State.
How Much Energy Do You Use?
NSW
VIC
QLD
WA
SA
TAS
NT
0%
8%
 15%    23%    30%
Non-Renewable
Renewable
✖ 83% - mostly black coal
✔ 17% - hydro, wind, roof PV, biomass, large PV
✖ 83% - all brown coal
✔ 17% - wind, roof solar, hydro, bit of biomass
✖ 91% - black coal, then gas
✔ 9% - roof solar, bit of biomass, hydro,& large PV
✖ 92% - gas & black coal
✔ 9% - wind then roof solar
✖ 49% - gas
✔ 51% - wind & roof solar, bit of large PV
✖ 5% - gas
✔ 95% - hydro
✖ 96% - gas
✔ 4% - solar 
Household Comparison
Electricity
Usage (kWh)
( meter readings
 
used )
    920
28 Dec 18 - 27 Mar 19 ( 90 days )           Charges
Peak Usage            920    24.20 c/kWH    $222.64
Supply Charge                 112.73 c/Day    $101.45
Your bills show you how much  
electricity you use per quarter 
and also the fixed supply 
( connection ) charge. It 
shows how your household 
compares to others in your 
area - go to: 
energymadeeasy.gov.au
for a detailed comparison by 
postcode and season.
Session 2 - page 1
Worksheets for detailed electricity and gas usage can be found here [2.1]
background image
How Much Energy Do You Use?
                                    Where does your energy go?  You might be 
surprised - the Australian climate is kind to 
us and our major appliances and systems 
are pretty energy efficient ( - look for the 
energy rating stickers )
But our hot water systems 
are old tech and our smaller 
items, lights, and set-ups that 
we tend to leave on stand-by, 
can be energy hogs.
For a detailed look at energy use and what to do about it go to our website  [2.2]
Low-No Cost Tips for Saving Energy at Home 
Living Areas
In summer, keep cool by closing windows, doors, curtains and blinds.
Use fans instead of air conditioners and set your air conditioner to 26°C.
Aim for natural cross flow ventilation when the sun is off the house.
In winter, reduce draughts by closing windows, doors and curtains.
Set central heating to 18°C, dress warmly and use blankets and throw rugs.
Put in LED lights and turn them off when not needed. 
Switch off appliances at the wall - most keep using energy in stand-by mode
Kitchen
Make sure there is plenty of space around your fridge so it works efficiently.
Check that the fridge door seals work, and keep the door firmly closed.
Make sure the fridge and freezer isn’t too full.
Use the lids on pots and pans to reduce cooking time.
Wait till the dishwasher is full, then put it on.
Bathroom and Laundry
Use cold water for washing hands and clothes.
Use a clothesline instead of the dryer.
Set your hot water to 60°C and then use hot water as little as possible.
Wait till the washing machine has a full load, then put it on.
Put in low-flow shower-heads - and aerator heads on taps.
Have shorter showers - no more than 4 minutes - use a timer.
Pools
Use a pool cover to keep the heat in and put in an efficient filter pump.
If you want a heated pool, install a solar heating system.
Only use the lighting you need for pool safety.
14%
25%
25%
8%
8%
6%
15%
Heating
Cooling
Lighting
Cooking
Hot Water
Appliances
TV Games 
Session 2 - page 2
background image
Planned Spending for Saving Energy at Home
Heating & Cooling : 21% of our energy use
$$ Draught-proof and Ventilation
 - sealing gaps around doors & windows, adding self closer to vents, 
covering fireplace openings, using carpets and floor rugs.
$$$ Insulation
 - clean and replace or install ceiling insulation batts to R4.1 rating, install underfloor insulation 
to R2.25, insulate walls to R2.4 rating.
$-$$
 
Shading and Ventilation
 - grow shade trees and plants, install verandahs & shutters
$-$$$ Double Glazing
 - DIY shrink film through to new installed double glaze windows.
$$ Personal Fans
 -  ceiling fan or focussed zone fans instead of large zone systems
Lighting - 8% of our energy use
$ LED lights
 - replace all existing with 10x more efficient LED bulbs and tubes.
$$ Skylights
 - install solar powered LED skylights in utility areas, plus pantry and toilet.
$ Timer Switches
 - install time and motion sensors on selected lights
$$ Rewire
 - one light per switch instead of one switch turning on more than one light.
Cooking - 8% of our energy use
$ Mini Electrics
 - match small fan-forced ovens, microwaves, rice cookers, sandwich makers, and steamers to 
your food preferences - can be efficient if used for short times
$$ Induction Cooking
 - less wasted heat and less CO2 than gas range tops.
Hot Water - 25% of our energy use
$ Thermostat
  - install a controller so you can select the temperature to suit the use - 40 C for showers and 50 
C for dishes for example.
$$$ Heat Pump Hot Water 
- very efficient source of hot water, can act as a solar “battery” if linked to solar PV 
and timed to heat at midday using the surplus electricity.
Appliances - 25% of our energy use
$$-$$$ Replacement 
- compare the energy rating of your existing appliances to new ones, and also the age 
and ongoing repair costs, as replacement might be recommended. eg: front load washing machines vs top 
load; chest vs upright freezers.
$ Placement & Ventilation
 - fridges and freezers need good ventilation to run efficiently, redesigning spaces 
and venting cupboards and pantries might be needed.
Zero Retirement 
- consider not using the appliance - air dry, non-iron, hand sweep - sell or gift, and borrow 
when needed - use a library of things, sharing sheds, neighbours.
TV & Games - 14% of our energy use.
$ Power Controllers
 - any step to reduce stand-by, to limit extended item charging.
$ Timers
 - any step to ensure items are only used when needed.
Zero Alternatives
 - explore other ways to entertain, other activities.
Solar Power & Renewables
Switching to “Green Power” with your electricity supplier won’t save you money, but will ensure that a growing 
percentage of power is sourced from renewable sources.
Domestic Solar Power - solar photovoltaic (PV) panels, usually roof mounted, and connected to the main 
electricity grid by an inverter, are now in over 2 million homes 
(17% nationally ) Most States are offering rebates and incentives to reduce the overall 
cost - payback times can be as short as six years. 
Session 2 - page 3
background image
Challenges
These are designed to be a fun way of exploring issues, making us aware of how reliant we are on 
the resources we have, as well as encouraging longer-term behavioural change. 
For one week – Take a meter reading ( Smart Meter / scroll button / 03 reading in kWh ) Wait a week 
and take another, at the same time as before. How much did you reduce your usage by? Did it hurt? 
Which things would you consider doing long term? How does this compare to your average daily use 
according to your audit? How much ($) did you save?
For one week, or one day – Try to go for a week (or a day) without TV, or lights, or heating. What 
did you give up for a week (or day)?  Was it hard?
For one week – Make sure there is never more than one light globe per person on in your home - but 
do consider personal safety. Could you achieve this? What were the problems that stopped you 
achieving this?
Kids Fun - if 1 kWh is like having a “servant” for an hour - can you work out how many “servants” you 
have in a typical week?  Hint: Toast for breakfast can add up to 1 ”servant” Watching TV a few hours 
each night can add up to 4 “servants” in a week. Boiling a kettle can add up to 1”energy servant” - 
catching a tram to work can add up to 2 “servants”
"
"
              More Energy Robot pages on the website  [2.3]
Suggested Session Plan
Catch Up - how has everyone’s week been?
10 min
Review Energy - what surprised you? how did your energy use compare? 
look back at where energy goes - how you you compare?
30 min
Low Cost Actions - which of these are you already doing? can you 
suggest other measures, other great ideas? how much ($) did you save?
30 min
Planned Spending - which of these have you already done? how has it 
worked out? what actions do you think you might take on? 
30 min
Challenges and Fun Ideas - suggest other ideas and activities?
10 min 
Before you close Session 2, take time to reflect on how the session went, 
think of steps that might be taken in the next session, consider how the 
others are reacting and responding. Think Head, Hands, & Heart.
10 min
  Further Information and Resources on our website.[2.4]
Session 2 - page 4
background image
Session 3 : Food
In this session we will look at the where and how of our food
Global food production doubled from 1960 to 2000 as we industrialised agriculture, but climate change 
impacts, and population growth, predict a further 70% increase will be needed by 2050 if we continue on the 
same path. However the ecologic cost of having the current huge variety of out-of-season, imported, and 
convenience packaged foods is huge - 30% of our ecologic footprint .
• processing, packing, transport, storage and waste disposal consumes fossil fuel & energy.
• large scale single product farming - monoculture - has depleted soil & caused erosion.
• modified “high yield” crops need chemical fertilisers and pesticides ( most made from oil ).
• Industrialisation needs money and so concentrates ownership and control.
• convenience packaging needs salt & fructose for shelf life, and colouring for marketing.
• high turnover, large scale farming needs locked in, large volumes, of water.
                More on the industrialisation and ecologic footprint  [3.1]
So Where Do You Stand Now on Food? 
Let us start with a food audit of your meals and food sourcing  [ a full detailed audit 
 
[3.2]
What is Your Typical Mix of Food Types?
Keep a diary of your meals for a week and make a note of:
• the source of each part - Imported, product of Australia, or sourced local item / home grown
• the type of packaging  - all waste (red bin), recyclable (yellow bin), or your bags & handling,
• the degree of pre-processing - raw-fresh, half process (dried,frozen), processed/ready to eat
• the waste part - scraps fully compostable, everything eaten, cooking/washing water waste.
• the cooking energy required - 30 minutes, 1 hour, more than 1 hour
"
 
 
 
.................and estimate the percentages for each aspect - eg: 
and, using a Season Food Guide 
[3.3]
, check the raw/fresh, local/home, and Australian produce #, and try to 
estimate how “sunlight powered” In Season vs “fossil fuel assisted”  Out of Season / Hot House Grown, your 
meals might be:
Session 3 - page 1
Tick Your Usual
Meats
Veg
Fruit
Dairy
Grains
Fish
Nuts
Breakfast
Lunch ( workdays )
Lunch ( weekends )
Dinner
Tea Breaks or Snacks
Source of Food
[ 12 ] imported
[ 80 ] Australian
[ 8 ] local / home
Source of Food
[     ] imported
[     ] Australian #
[     ] local / home #
Type of Packaging
[     ] all waste
[     ] recyclable
[     ] own bags 
Pre-Processing
[     ] raw-fresh #
[     ] half processed
[     ] ready to eat
Waste Component
[     ] compostable
[     ] everything eaten
[     ] water to waste
Cooking Energy
[     ] 30 minutes
[     ] one hour
[     ] more than 1 hr
[      ]  Seasonal / Sunlight
[       ] Fossil Fuelled 
background image
The Issues Around Food
Session 3 - page 2
Sources of Food
Food Miles  a study found that the total 
distance for all transportation for a typical food 
basket in Melbourne - 29 common food items, 
was 70,803 km - twice around the earth [3.4]
[ rice 9700, sugar 2300, chips 2000, tea 8300 ] 
this is expected for Imported Foods, but mass 
produced Australian Products can also gain 
travel miles between picking, and packing.
Pesticide Residues - are also an issue 
[ apples 15%, lettuce 4%, bread 2% ] [3.5] 
because weeds and pest insects love acres of 
monoculture, high volume farmed food. The 
industrialisation of rural regions also sparks 
social issues like worker exploitation, and 
animal cruel factory farming.
Local and Home Grown - knowing where your 
food comes from, meeting the growers and 
makers, knowing what is in your food, and 
seeing your money recycle through the 
community. But what do the claims mean? - 
organicchemical freebiodynamic, and 
permaculture [3.6]
Types of Packaging
Some packaging may be necessary for 
processed and bulk foods, and there are studies 
that show that the plastic waste is less climate 
damaging than the effect of 20% of food wasted 
through damage or spoiling in shipping, storage, 
and supermarket display. [3.7]
But there is no reason (apart from economic) 
why the packaging is not fully recycled or 
reused. There are government standards that 
label recyclable plastic, and programs like 
REDcycle that manage soft plastics that 
otherwise become waste. [3.8]
Do It Yourself options are plentiful - start with 
local, low food miles, shops and farmers 
markets; take your own produce and carry 
bags; reuse your own containers for tricky items 
- honey, peanut butter, cleaning liquids; and use 
beeswax or silicone wraps and cloth fridge bags 
to store foods.
Pre-Processing
Raw & Fresh - hygiene and storage. Wash all 
food preparation areas, wash and scrub home 
harvested produce before bringing inside, and 
wash and rinse produce just before eating or 
making into the meal. 
[3.9]
Half Processed - longer life preserved foods - 
dried fruit, vegetables, and meats; dehydrated 
products like spaghetti; bottled and canned foods 
( oxygen, bacteria, and mould free ); jams & 
passata, are convenient and help us extend 
seasonal foods, but check the ingredients list on 
commercial items. 
[3.10]
 
Ready to Eat - basically engineered food. While 
convenient and tasty, the ingredient list highlights 
the salts, sugars, colourings, and flavour agents, 
needed to give these an appealing appearance, a 
long shelf life, and to use up cheaper base 
ingredients. [3.11]
Waste Component
Compostable - the most basic is fruit and 
vegetable peelings and cuttings saved for your 
compost bin. But by using a Bokashi
 
type 
fermentation system, prepared foods, meat, dairy, 
egg, coffee & tissues can also be turned into 
compost.  [3.12]
Everything Eaten - thoughtful planning means no 
wasted food, just enough for the one meal, or a 
cascade of left-overs into other meals. [3.13]
Water Waste - hygiene and meal preparation 
comes first, but develop a plan for the separation 
and collection of this water, and use it to grow 
more food. 
Cooking Energy
Time is Money & Energy - cooking multiple 
meals at the same time - so investigate 
pressure cooking, pans matched to tasks, 
microwave, solar & turbo ovens [3.14]
background image
Spending On Food Options
Nil Free Food
 - check out your local Food Swap groups, explore apps for “excess produce” groups, and 
guerilla gardening, even check out dumpster diving.  [3.15]
Nil-$ Go Vegetarian
 - avoiding the problems of animal rights, factory farming, and hormones in meat, plant 
farming is 20 to 50 times more efficient than meat production, and contributes 5 to 30 times less in greenhouse 
gas emissions. Try fewer meat meals and smaller portions, and if you do buy meat, swap quantity for quality, 
and grain-fed for grass-fed.
$$ Sustainable Seafoods
 - while an excellent food source, global fish stocks are declining and many species 
are endangered - shop using a sustainable seafood guide [3.16]
$ Farmers Markets
 - and local food swaps, farm gate sales, and community gardens - explore your local area 
and enjoy the fresh, seasonal foods. A food swap described [3.17]
$-$$
 
Shop via
 
OpenFoodNetwork.org
 
- go online via the search directory or the interactive map, and discover 
specialist shops, bulk food wholesalers, food co-ops, organic farms, orchards, and vineyards. Plan a visit or 
order online. [3.18]
Grow Your Own
$ Small Space Container Garden
 - herbs like thyme, rosemary, basil, mint, and garlic chives, salad & asian 
greens ( rocket, lettuce, tatsoi ) and strawberries. If a bit more room go for pots of dwarf tomatoes, and chilli 
bushes. But check - good sun, not too hot, and water often.
$ No Dig Garden
 - on a base of wet newspapers (weed barrier) build a “lasagne” of alternating brown (carbon-
based - straw, leaves, wood chips, newspapers) and green (nitrogen-rich - manure, compost, worm castings.) 
layers. Water each as you build. Perfect for potatoes, beans, pumpkins, & in second year for deeper rooted 
vegetables - carrots, onions, beetroot.
$$ Suburban Bush Tucker 
- edible Australian native plants like muntries, finger lime, warrigal greens, apple-
berry, native pig-face, midgen berry, and sea-celery, can add spice to small gardens. In larger spaces, trees 
like riberry, and macadamia. [3.19
Waste & Compost
$$ Worm Farm
 - go from a basic funnel in the ground, to a three layered structure on legs, Starting with a box 
of special worms ( Tiger or Indian Blue - not garden earthworms ) this will rapidly compost fruit and vegetable 
kitchen waste, and produce highly nutritious liquid fertiliser. 
$$ Bokashi System 
- Collect your fruit and vegetable peelings and buy a Bokashi type fermentation system, so 
that prepared foods, meat, dairy, egg, coffee & tissues can also be tuned into compost.
Extending Shelf Life
$-$$ Food Preservation 
- invest in or share a bottling kit, preserving jars, or a food dehydrating cabinet, and 
take a class or learn online how to process foods into jams, pickles, sauces, and dried fruits and vegetables.
[3.20]
Nil Minimalism 
- sort your pantry, bring older items to the front, sort your fridge and cloth wrap cucumber, 
herbs, capsicum, celery, beans and eggplant, don’t pack the shelves - let the fridge breathe on the inside. 
Store potatoes and onions in the dark and cool and away from each other, because like bananas, they give off 
a gas that quick-ripens and spoils other vegetables.
One important issue is the huge amount of water used to grow food.
In Melbourne per day, our houshold use averages 262 litres, 
but the food for that household uses 475 lt per home, per day. [3.21]
Session 3 - page 3
background image
Challenges
These are designed to be a fun way of exploring issues, making us aware of how reliant we are on the 
resources we have, as well as encouraging longer-term behavioural change. 
For one meal – Just for you ( or organise a multi household street event ) - try to source everything from just 
your local region - maybe only things from your farmers market.
Forever – Make one day a meatless day, and then see if you can add more days.
Over one month – Letter-box survey your neighbours asking who composts, and who has chooks, worm 
farms, and bokashi bins, then suggest starting a food waste share program - swap food scraps for fresh eggs, 
or worm castings and juice, or just help someone with no garden manage their scraps. 
One weekend - look up the OpenFood Network or online search your town and plan a 
family walk, bike, or car trip, to visit a community garden, food co-op, organic farm, or 
just to find a new wholefood grocer.
During the year - look up Permablitz online. Explore going on a blitz to help out and 
learn garden skills, and then consider using a blitz to build or revamp your own garden
Kids Fun - start a carrot top garden, or plant seeds in soil or potting mix in an egg 
carton. Give them their own space in your garden. Ask older kids to write out, and 
illustrate, vegetarian or local food recipes, and make a street recipe book.
Suggested Session Plan
Catch Up - how has everyone’s week been?
10 min
Review Food - what surprised you? what did you discover looking at your 
eating and food purchasing patterns?
30 min
Issues Around Food - which of these have you already considered when 
making food choices? did anything change your mind?
30 min
Planned Spending - which of these have you already done? how has it 
worked out? what actions do you think you might take on? 
30 min
Challenges and Fun Ideas - suggest other ideas and activities?
10 min 
Before you close Session 3, take time to reflect on how the session went, 
think of steps that might be taken in the next session, consider how the 
others are reacting and responding. Think Head, Hands, & Heart.
10 min
Session 3 - page 4
background image
Session 4 : Water
In this session we will look at the use of fresh water.
Only 2.5% of the water in the world is fresh or salt free. Two thirds of this is locked up in snow and ice, and a 
third is underground in soil and aquifers. Only 0.3% is available in rain, rivers, and lakes. With climate change 
predicted to make rain events more unpredictable - more droughts and more floods - water conservation and 
management is becoming crucial.
Most of our fresh water is used in 
Agriculture. Other Industries include 
manufacturing, electricity and gas 
production, and commercial business.
In QLD and WA, Mining is a large water user 
in the Other Industries data.
Our national average per person is 
262 litres/day for household use. 
This varies by State (litres/day/person)
NSW - 204 
 
WA  - 322
VIC  
- 177   
TAS - 189
QLD  - 214   
NT   - 602
SA 
- 177   
ACT - 209
How Much Water Do You Use?
Your 
bill will show the details of the meter reading
the 
service supply charges ( cost to be connected )
comparison with your use, and the year before
and 
a guide to how you rate with other households
         
Where Do You Use Water at Home?
Session 4 - page 1
Worksheets for water usage on our website [4.1]
When choosing 
appliances look 
for the water 
rating sticker
background image
Why Save Water at Home?
Domestic water use is only a small part of our national use, but everything we do to save water ( and money ) 
at home has other impacts too.
• Reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: It takes energy  to pump, treat and supply water to 
our  homes. We then use  energy  to heat that water.  For  every  drop of water  you  don't use, you are  saving 
energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
• Support the  natural  environment  and  wildlife:  Becoming  water  aware  at  home  spills over  into  being 
water aware in business, in choosing what we buy, what we use, and our politics. Good water management 
policy and water efficient infrastructure is vitally important.
Low-No Cost Tips for Saving Water at Home 
Anywhere with a Tap
Fix any leaks - a new washer or tap head can saves litres per hour in drips.
Turn off the tap when not actually using the water.
Collect any clean ( enough ) water from one task and use it in another.
 
( Rinse water can be used for the first wash of dirty dishes or watering plants ).
Install aerator or low flow heads to make taps efficient water misers.
Kitchen
Don’t rinse dishes under a running tap, use a bucket or second sink.
Collect any running water in a tub or bottle and use it on plants
Wash vegetables and salad in the spinner bowl and save that water too.
Don’t defrost under running water, plan ahead and fridge defrost.
Wait till the dishwasher is full, then put it on, and use it instead of the sink.
         ( modern dishwashers use far less water than a couple of smaller hand-washed jobs 
)
Bathroom
Fit a low-flow shower head.
Don’t leave the tap on when brushing your teeth - rinse, spit, on off.....
Buy a shower timer ( or one song on the phone ) for a 3-4 minute shower.
Consider a basin ( sponge or cloth ) bath if just a quick clean is OK.
Use a bucket to collect the cold shower water before it starts to run hot.
Ban baths - or for kids, just enough water to clean them ( and for a couple of splashes ) 
Toilet
Install a two button, low flush toilet cistern ( flush water tank )
If stuck with an old cistern, explore using tank inserts to reduce overall volumes.
 
( clean river stones, a bottle filled with water or sand - just don’t block or jam it )
Only flush when necessary - “if it is yellow, let it mellow........” you get the idea.
Laundry
Double check that things need full machine washing - maybe rinse & air dry?
Start with a 4-star water and energy efficient washing machine, preferably a front loader, and then read 
the book - find the right setting for the task ( water level, temperature, number of rinses, wash times ) - 
and fully load per cycle.
Session 4 - page 2
background image
Outdoors
Redesign your garden - replace the grass lawn ( or let it go brown in summer ).
Replant with local Australian native plants and trees - these will already be drought tolerant, and will suit 
the local native birds and insects.
When needed - water deeply and infrequently, to encourage strong roots and deep water storage both in 
the ground and in the plants. Worms like that too.
Mulch deeply - it stops evaporation, chokes weeds, and give mini-beasts a home.
Rake and broom clean paths - don’t use water spray cleaning.
Hand water, don’t use sprinklers unless supervised - intelligent watering works best.
Got a pool - use a pool cover to stop evaporation, use a cartridge filter instead of wasteful back-washing, 
divert rain-water to top it up.
Planned Spending for Saving Water at Home
Greywater
Used water from bathrooms and laundries, some kitchen water ( but not toilets, and dishwashers )
$ Grey Water Diverter Funnels
 - rubber or silicone funnels that can be pushed into outlet pipes, 
usually at inspection points, to block and divert the water into garden hoses. This is not 
recommended for edible plants or herbs, but good for general gardens & grass.
$$$ Grey Water Systems
 - using commercial parts and plans to permanently divert grey water into a 
sequence of settling, filtering, and treatment processes, so that the end water can be used across 
the whole garden. Some systems use above ground pods, others use pipe and sand/gravel sub-soil 
networks. 
Rainwater Collection
$$ Downpipe diverters
 - replace sections of downpipes with leaf filter and diverter modules - 
connected to suitable diameter hoses to garden beds or storage tanks.
$$$ Tanks
 - research first - a litre of water weighs I kilogram - so tanks need flat stable bases or 
stands. They also need clean input water, so gutters, diverters, and filters will need to be kept clean. 
Water from a tank flows according to the height from the top of the water in the tank to the final 
outlet point - hydrostatic pressure - but 1 meter only produces 1.4 PSI and a garden tap is typically 
40 PSI - you may need a pump as well.
$$ Swales 
- study the flow of rain water across your garden. Think about changing the levels of 
garden beds, or building earth walls to create mini dams, or just small barriers to slow the flow of 
water across the garden.
Warning - tanks and pools of still water are breeding grounds for mosquitoes
Garden Beds
$$-$$$ Wicking Beds 
- these are constructed 
garden beds that enclose a water-proof inner 
membrane. This holds an inlet stand pipe (A); 
and is punctured by a drain pipe with tap (B). 
The bottom of the inlet pipe is covered with a 
layer of washed sand or gravel ( the water 
layer ), topped with a water permeable geo-
fabric to separate the soil and plants from the 
water. The soil bed sits on the geo-fabric. The 
water in the base comes up to the plants as 
water vapour and straight into the roots, making 
these efficient and easy to manage systems.
Session 4 - page 3
Sample Wicking Bed
!
A
                                                                      B
background image
$-$$ Soaker Hoses
 - there are three types - above ground, granular rubber, hoses that weep water 
under pressure; - below ground, plastic piping with pre-cut slots that leak water at all pressures; and  
- plastic kit systems that drip and micro-spray from various screw in fittings and heads, while under 
pressure from a tap or pump.
Challenges
These are designed to be a fun way of exploring issues, making us aware of how reliant we are on 
the resources we have, as well as encouraging longer-term behavioural change. 
For one day – Fill a bucket ( 10-15 litres ) per person in your household. Can you get through the 
day without turning on a tap?  Drinking, cooking, washing and using the dirty water for the toilet. 
Achieving 20 litres/day is a UN Water Target, many people have less.
For one week, or one day – Try to collect all the used water ( use it on the garden ), and measure 
and record it, and compare this to your State’s average use per person data.
For one week – Break your habits - plan how you wash & shower; organise meals to make dish 
washing minimal and efficient; re-organise your plants for efficient water use; 
Kids Fun - Ask them to write 3 minute shower songs, and record them for playback. Take them to a 
native plant nursery and let them choose a plant each. Assign them to path sweeping and make hand 
watering sessions part of their household duties.
Session 4 - page 4
Suggested Session Plan
Catch Up - how has everyone’s week been?
10 min
Review Water - what surprised you? how did your water use compare? 
step through the places of water use - how you you compare?
30 min
Low Cost Actions - which of these are you already doing? can you 
suggest other measures, other great ideas? how much ($) did you save?
30 min
Planned Spending - which of these have you already done? how has it 
worked out? what actions do you think you might take on? 
30 min
Challenges and Fun Ideas - suggest other ideas and activities?
10 min 
Before you close Session 4, take time to reflect on how the session went, 
think of steps that might be taken in the next session, consider how the 
others are reacting and responding. Think Head, Hands, & Heart.
10 min
background image
Session 5 : Transport
In this session we look at transport - freight and people.
All forms of Transport combined - cars, trucks, public transport, domestic flights and shipping - contribute 18% 
to our Greenhouse Gas emissions, the second largest after Electricity (33%). 
And it is growing by 10% per decade despite more efficient vehicles, and energy saving programs.
The main part of the problem is cars, vans, utes, and light trucks, making about half of those emissions ( equal 
per year to Queensland’s entire coal and gas fired electricity emissions ).
This is because we have :
• some of the worst polluting cars - no greenhouse gas emission standards on cars and many active 
inefficient, high polluting older cars; 
• high car use - 87% of us travel by car to school or work ( only 5% public transport, 5% walking,1% bike ) 
and we have high distances travelled per person ( 8,800 kms national average )
• low public transport usage - despite it being at least 1/3 cheaper per kilometre than net car costs ( and we 
have an underfunded train, tram, & bus infrastructure by world standards )
Transport solutions - improving city planning; investing in public transport; encouraging 
people to shift out of cars and on to public and active transport modes; and adopting 
technological developments such as renewable powered electric cars, buses, light rail 
and trains are together capable of reducing greenhouse gas pollution levels globally 
by 15 - 40% from business as usual, by 2050 (IPCC 2014). 
So What is Your Transport Mix?
what about your holidays each year?
Urban Planning & Safety
Now go back and circle the daily transport choices that you had to make because of poor urban planning ( you 
had no option other than use a freeway, public transport timetables don’t suit, etc.) or for safety reasons ( poor 
lighting or access, infrequent services, general safety, etc. ) and an extra big tick where good planning 
supported your choice.
Session 5 - page 1
Enter km or 
s to show your 
relative use of each
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Car, Ute, SUV, Van
Tram / Bus
Train / Light Rail
Bike / Walk
Car Pool / Ride Share
Service or Delivery to you
Overseas Holiday
Interstate Holiday
Local Holiday
background image
How Much Energy Does it Take?
We know how much heat energy is in a litre of fuel, so we can use kilowatt hours to compare forms of 
transport ( including human power if we add in food energy too #)
Public or mass transport compares well if it is fairly full, but electricity from non-renewable, fossil fuel based 
generation blows out any energy advantage in electric cars and bikes.
( the Walking # data assumes high transport supermarket shopping and falls dramatically 
if you switch to home grown and local, low food mile sources, and vegetarian diets )
 
 
 
 
 
                More about energy efficiency in transport on our website 5.1]
Tips for Transport Efficiency
Walk or Ride
A staggering 50% of trips are less than 2 kilometres. And many bicycle trips actually take less time than 
the same trip by car. (Add in the exercise and proven boost to mental health!)
Driving Well ( when you must use a car )
Regularly check your tyre pressure. Under-inflated tyres can increase fuel consumption by 3 per cent 
and take 10,000 kilometres off the tyre's life.
Service your car regularly. A well-tuned car can use 15 per cent less fuel.
Slow down. Driving at 90 kilometres per hour uses 25 % less fuel than driving at 110 k/h.
Don't idle. If you are stopping for more than ten seconds, turn your car off.
Drive smoothly. Stopping and starting uses more fuel.
Under 70 km/h - Open your window rather than using your air conditioner. Air conditioning can increase 
fuel consumption by 10 per cent. Over 70 km/h the drag caused by having your window down will use 
more fuel than the air conditioning.
Screw on your fuel cap firmly to avoid evaporation and leaks when turning corners.
Travel light. Don't use your car to store tools and sports equipment, an extra 50 kilograms of weight 
increases fuel consumption by 2 per cent.
Remove roof racks and anything fixed to the outside of your car when they are not in use to minimise 
wind resistance.
Session 5 - page 2
background image
Plan Ahead
Organise a number of small errands into one trip to save time and fuel. Consider if a phone call, email or 
letter would do instead. Make a shopping list in advance.
Use Google Maps or a local map app to explore the transport options - use the walk and transit options 
to compare trips - add on the car parking costs and time wasted.
Talk to friends and co-workers and explore ride sharing and car pooling options.
If you can buy a transit card, keep it topped up, it might seem like money spent. But if it means you can 
quickly take a public transport option it will save you, and the planet, in the long run. Also check your event 
ticket, many now include free public transport to reduce congestion.
Planned Spending for Better Transport
Bicycles
$ Basic Bikes
 - any good quality bike - but buy from a bike shop and have it fitted to your size and how you 
plan to use it - learn how to service it, or visit a Repair Cafe. 
$$ E Bikes
 - as above, but learn about charging and maintenance, and learn how to ride one - it is not the 
same as a pedal bike, and how the power kicks in can affect your ride.
$$$ Cargo Bikes 
- pedal or electric, these can replace a family car, plus it is lots of  family fun.
 
 
 
 
 
More about bikes, bike safety, and electric bikes [5.2]
Hybrid & Electric Cars
$$ Petrol Hybrids 
- Petrol drive cars with electric motors that support the petrol motor. They smooth out the 
starting and low speed running and improve fuel economy by assisting when the petrol engine’s revolution 
(spinning) range is most fuel inefficient. They can have low speed, short run EV (electric only) options, handy 
in car parks. They charge their battery when driving on petrol. 
$$$ Plug-In Hybrids
 - Electric drive cars with petrol engines that charge the battery pack, and support the 
electric motors under heavy load, high road speed, or when the battery is low. These can be changed from 
electric power sockets at home and from fast charger stations. These do not drive like petrol or hybrid cars. 
The petrol engine only runs in its most fuel efficient range so overall fuel efficiency if high, and general daily 
use can be entirely battery only.
$$$$ Electric Vehicles 
- Electric drive and high capacity battery cars. These are recharged from dedicated 
home electric sockets and special fast charge stations. The electric motor technology monitors most aspects 
of the car and mildly adjusts driving and braking to maximise battery range so that 200-300 kilometre trips are 
normal. These cars are also quick and nimble on the road.
Car Share 
Nil Car-Pooling 
- the most basic is to talk to friends, co-workers, or neighbours and arrange sharing around 
each other’s cars and common destinations. 
$ Ride Sharing
 - many commercial driver services, and some hire car services offer booking apps that allow 
multiple passengers to share all or part of the total trip or car hire period. More [5.3][5.3]
$ Car Share 
- with online booking systems and membership requirements, these range from using a private 
car for short trip and holiday trip use, to commercial car and van short use systems. The advantage is reduced 
net car ownership, no servicing and maintenance costs for the user, and fall-backs for breakdown or other 
road issues. More [5.4]
Holidays
Local is Best  
- cutting back on travel costs means more luxury and special activities, it also boosts the local 
economy and helps decentralise and grow regional communities.
Session 5 - page 3
background image
Challenges
These are designed to be a fun way of exploring issues, making us aware of how reliant we are on 
the resources we have, as well as encouraging longer-term behavioural change. 
For one week – keep a travel diary and then sit down and map each on Google Maps, see what 
walking and public transport options you might have taken. Were you surprised, or did it just make 
the current poor infrastructure more obvious? 
On one weekend – Go to a local professional bike shop ( or e-bike or cargo bike shop ) and get up 
to date with current bike technology, design, and commuter options.
On one weekend – Plan a public transport outing. Pack a picnic and travel out and around on the 
networks sightseeing as you go, or plan a no-car picnic at a park or beach accessible by train or bus, 
or bike ( - if you already ride )
For one week or more  – Join or organise a local “Walking School Bus” so that groups of 
neighbourhood kids are supervised as they walk to school.
Anytime – even if you don’t go, explore the options in local holidays. Newspapers and motoring 
organisation magazines often feature local destinations, trips, and sights. Have fun just planning a 
fun, interesting, or luxurious, local holiday.
Kids Fun - anything on wheels can be fun for kids - plan walking shopping trips with bikes, scooters, 
skateboards, and Yes! I even saw one family shopping in a wheelbarrow. 
Session 5 - page 4
Suggested Session Plan
Catch Up - how has everyone’s week been?
10 min
Review Transport - what surprised you? how did your transport use 
compare? were you aware of the range of energy uses per passenger?
30 min
Efficiency Actions - which of these are you already doing? can you 
suggest other measures, other great ideas? how much ($) did you save?
30 min
Planned Spending - which of these have you already done? how has it 
worked out? what options do you think you might take up? 
30 min
Challenges and Fun Ideas - suggest other ideas and activities?
10 min 
Before you close Session 5, take time to reflect on how the session went, 
think of steps that might be taken in the next session, consider how the 
others are reacting and responding. Think Head, Hands, & Heart.
10 min
How much space do 200 people take up? Can you draw this?
1 train carriage ( 54 sqm ) = 4 buses ( 144 sqm ) = 200 cars ( 1500 sqm ) = 1 bike path (400 sqm)
background image
Session 6 : Waste & Consumption
In this session we will look at what we use and the waste we produce
The figures on what we use, and what we need to manage as waste, is staggering. Annual waste comes to 
3,300 kgs per person. A 1/3rd household waste, a 1/3rd commerce, a 1/3rd construction. 
Overall around 53% is recycled or reused, but this varies by waste type:
Building 72%      Green 54%      Ash 43%( mostly roads )      Hazardous 27%      Paper 60%
Metals 90%      Plastics 12%      Other 80% ( includes farm waste )      Glass 57%      Clothes 4%
This is only part of the story - studies suggest that we use up 70 times as much in raw resources to make each 
kilogram of what we then consider waste. And a lot of the “waste” was never used in the first place - a 1/5th of 
food bought is never eaten and gets sent to rubbish. more [6.1]
So Where Do You Stand Now on Waste? 
The ABC TV series “ War on Waste” - highlighted the the areas where households and schools can make a 
difference with waste - a summary of the series is on the website [6.2]
But some of the facts were:
85% of soft plastics from bags and packaging ends up in landfill.
On average 1/3 of household rubbish is food waste.
Supermarkets and food retailers send about 170,000 tonnes of food to landfill each year.
Three-quarters of clothing purchased is thrown out within a year.
It takes 2700 litres of water to produce one item of clothing.
1 billion, single use, coffee cups are used in Australia every year, and not recycled.
Glass is infinitely recyclable - but only 56% gets recycled.
1 billion plastic water bottles are bought in Australia every year - 20% get recycled.
A school was sending 9 tonnes of rubbish a week to landfill - costing them $2,300 a month
How Full is Your Typical Council Bin on Collection ?
Does your council 
take food recycling 
in the Green Bin ?
( FOGO )
Session 6 - page 1
Type
How Full
General Waste - Red Bin
Full    3/4 Full    1/2 Full    1/4 Full     Empty
Recycling - Yellow Bin
Full    3/4 Full    1/2 Full    1/4 Full     Empty
Green Waste - Green Bin
Full    3/4 Full    1/2 Full    1/4 Full     Empty
background image
The Waste Hierarchy
 - waste avoidance and resource recovery strategy
The original 3R’s strategy - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle - was easy to understand and got action underway, but it 
did not try to design waste out of the system in the first place. 
So it has been expanded and current government and industry waste hierarchy policies now focus on 
avoidance rather than better disposal methods. The most important action starts with avoid & rethink & reduce, 
with the need to treat and dispose being the least of the activities.
 
 
This same strategy can be applied to domestic waste management.
Refuse, Rethink & Reduce
Refuse plastic bags, go prepared with re-useable bags, containers and carry bags.
Reject the poorly packaged option. Look for alternative items, or try other outlets.
Rethink the source of supply - consider farmer’s markets, local suppliers, places where you can question 
the design, packaging, materials, and drill back to the production methods.
Rethink services and conveniences - can a bit of forward planning reduce the waste you have to deal 
with, reduce the amount of materials used, and reduce nett energy or fuel use?
Actually rethink every purchase - do you really need it? Are you reacting to advertising?
Reduce the chemicals in the home - try simple natural cleaners like vinegar/lemon juice liquid cleaner, or 
bi-carbonate of soda scrub.
Refuse to use anything made with PVC, or polyvinyl chloride, as these create dioxins during 
manufacturing, use, and disposal. And dioxins are known carcinogens.
Refuse ( by Returning ) excess packaging on consumer items and electronics.
Rethink the use of virgin materials, look for the things made from pre-used materials, encourage a 
circular economy where resources go back into productive use.
Reduce nett waste by choosing biodegradable options when available.
Reuse
Choose new items that promise to have a long life. Re-fillable water bottles, stainless steel lunch boxes, 
metal cutlery sets, cloth napkins, handkerchiefs, cotton and bamboo cloths.
Research big purchases and household appliances for ease of repair, degree of recyclable materials at 
the end of it’s life, lack or otherwise of toxic materials, & durability of surfaces.
Do It Yourself options are plentiful - make your own carry bags, beeswax food wraps.
Reuse containers and shop at bulk foods stores, find shops and markets that let you drop off clean 
empties and take the same, newly filled with products, including wine and milk.
Session 6 - page 2
background image
Rehome, Repurpose ( recycle )
Rehome surplus items through Charity Op Shops, lists on Gumtree or Freecycle.org, posts on local 
Good Karma and similar neighbourhood, or special interest, Facebook Groups.
Rehome by organising neighbourhood Garage Sales and Swap Meets.
Repurpose by inventive use of old furniture, building materials and fittings as new items.
Repurpose chipped cups as pots for plants, old sheets as soft cleaning cloths, an old suitcase as a pet 
bed, shattered pottery as tiles in a garden mosaic.
Repurpose ( recycle ) in using things for other functions, like a mattress inner-sping unit as a vertical pot 
plant holder or growing wall, 
Rot & Compost, Recycle
Collect your fruit and vegetable peelings and cuttings and create a compost bin. Use a Bokashi
 
type 
fermentation system, so that prepared foods, meat, dairy, egg, coffee & tissues can also be tuned into 
compost. 
Use cardboard and newspaper to make weed mats, or shredded as carbon rich additions to the compost 
bin or as mulch. 
Develop a plan for the separation and collection of waste water, and use non-greasy grey water to grow 
more food.
Recycle glass separately to avoid contamination with other things in your Yellow Bin.
Recycle by pulling things apart and making art, toys, kids play items, and by correctly recycling the parts 
that won’t contaminate the recycle pathways ( dispose what is left )
Treat & Disposal ( the things you can not deal with yourself )
Take advantage of Waste Recovery Programs - toner ink to “Cartridges 4 Planet Ark” boxes at Post 
Offices or other office supplies outlets, mobile phones to “Mobile Muster” or similar collection points, 
fluorescent tubes and bulbs to council and library collection bins, 
Investigate your council’s e-waste program, and ask about old paint and oils collections.
If in doubt, go online to the many State sponsored sites, like Sustainability Victoria, that allow a search by 
item, to find the correct recycle options and service locations  more [6.3]
What Are Other New Ideas & Actions?
Buy Nothing Project
 - a global network of local groups that don’t sell, swap or barter, but gift into each group, 
posting what they have in surplus, and asking when they need something - the challenge is see if you can go 
7 days without buying anything. Most groups focus on building hyper-local gift economies ( and sustainable 
communities )
Repair Cafe & Fix-It 
- Repair Cafés are free meeting places, all about repairing things together.
You will find tools and materials to help you make any repairs you need. On clothes, furniture, electrical 
appliances, bicycles, crockery, appliances, toys, etc.. You'll also find expert volunteers, with repair skills in all 
kinds of fields. This is a national network dedicated to avoiding waste.
Zero Waste Festivals 
- volunteer groups, working with private suppliers, are working on making large music, 
arts, and sports festivals zero food and drink waste events. They do this by supplying all the food vendors 
and outlets with durable, washable, plates, bowls, cup, mugs, and eating implements, and setting up wash 
stations and supervised waste recycling bins so that the nett result is minimal landfill, some clean grey water, 
and happy participants. One festival of 16,000 people, over 4 days, reported a drop in landfill from 16 tons to 
one 240 litre bin.
Session 6 - page 3
background image
Tool Library & Library of Things 
- or Sharing Sheds - lots of names, but basically a subscription based lending 
library of power tools and serious handy-person equipment at one end, to the sort of things found in the 
pantry, kitchen, sewing room or play-room at the other. Pretty much everything you might need for a project 
or party. Booking are usually made online, with set times for use and return, so other borrowings can be 
booked up. Just about everything is donated, and the aim is to reduce costs, get maximum use and life out of 
items, and save waste.
Community
 
Litter Action 
- illegal dumping and general litter costs local government around $70 million a year 
in collection and clean up costs. Community and volunteer groups like “Clean Up Australia” the various 
“Adopt A ....road, highway, town”  groups, and bodies like “ Riverkeepers” are running clean up and collection 
events, and campaigns to raise public awareness. 
There are also citizen action apps like “Snap Send Solve” that send notifications to councils, water 
authorities, and supermarkets of illegal or inappropriate dumping, and use photos to help prosecute 
offenders.
Challenges
For one week - every time you get out a commercial cleaner, go online and look for a natural or low 
impact alternative like borax, eucalytus oil, lemon juce, vinegar, or salt.
Over one month - keep a diary of the tools and implements you use just once, and then think about 
sharing them with your neighbours, or donating them to a library of things.
Over one month - revisit the Bin Collection quiz - did you manage to reduce your waste?
Kids Fun - give out extra pocket money, but for spending at your local Op Shop, and talk about the 
bargains and the landfill saved. Organise a junk craft day - get ideas from books at your library. 
Organise a toy and game clean up and let them decide on keep-gift-donate.
Suggested Session Plan
Catch Up - how has everyone’s week been?
10 min
Review Waste - what surprised you? what did you discover about the 
different product streams and industries?
30 min
Where Did You Stand - have you seen the ABC TV’s War on Waste? 
how waste-aware where you before this session?
30 min
The Waste Hierarchy  - which of these have you already done? how has 
it worked out? what other actions do you think you might take on? 
30 min
Challenges and Fun Ideas - suggest other ideas and activities?
10 min 
Before you close Session 6, take time to reflect on how the session went, 
think of steps that might be taken in the next session, consider how the 
others are reacting and responding. Think Head, Hands, & Heart.
10 min
Session 6 - page 4
background image
Session 7 : Next Steps
In this session we will look at what we might do next.
Wikipedia gives a good summary of the Transition Town movement [7.1] but basically, it started in 2004 when 
people applied permaculture principles [7.2] to the problem of Peak Oil [7.3] - how would communities survive 
if everything running on cheap fossil fuels - food, transport, housing, and business - became expensive or 
scarce? The lucky outcome was the realisation that when local communities created a common vision of an 
energy independent future, it started to happen.  What they discovered was that each level of society - 
individual, street, neighbourhood, local business, local government - did what they could to be part of, and 
support, that common vision. 
The range of issues has expanded as we experience the environmental impacts of climate warming, and the 
social, civil, & economic instabilities created by globalisation - but the solutions 
that come from creating, and then working towards, a common vision still work.
Environmental scientists talk about “Tipping Points” - those changes, like ocean temperatures, or atmosphere 
CO2 levels, that trigger a cascade of related events and permanent changes. But there are also “Behavioural 
Spill-Overs” - those small changes in personal actions and attitudes that trigger further action in both the same 
category - eg: turning off the tap when brushing your teeth can trigger rebuilding your garden with wicking 
beds - and in related areas - eg: pre-sorting your household waste can trigger a deeper connection to solar 
energy and efficiency. However, these spill-over actions are particularly strong triggers when they are seen or 
shared by others.
That is the point of these sessions. You have explored, with others, a small part of the progress towards a 
reimagined and rebuilt world - a more caring & connected culture - one reconnected with nature - a reclaimed 
economy - and reimagined work, and you created your own turning points
Turning, Tipping & Spill-Over Points
Reflecting on the earlier sessions - what were your “spill-overs” - your turning points?
What action did you take and then realise it had triggered more extensive actions.
Personal - Family
Friends - Neighbours
Energy
Food
Water
Transport
Waste
Session 7 - page 1
background image
Resilient Communities
The National Strategy for Disaster Resilience (NEMC, 2009) includes the following four, core features in its 
description of a resilient community:
1. functioning well while under stress - members are connected to one another and work together in ways 
that enable it to function in the face of stress and trauma.
2. successful adaptation - a positive response to changes in the physical, social or economic environment - 
shifts attention to capacity in the context of change rather than focusing solely, and unproductively, on a 
community's vulnerabilities.
3. self reliance and self-sufficient - not reliant on long supply chains, or external finance, 
4. social capacity - high levels of trust, cooperation, and strong interpersonal relationships
This gives us a framework to develop actions and activities  - An Activism Plan
1. practice working together - small projects like a community garden, or larger projects like a sustainability 
festival - focus on learning to listen and engage, on delegation and sharing.
2. work on developing skills overall - draw in the already skilled as teachers; organise knowledge-sharing 
opportunities - talks, films, web resources.
3. build micro-networks and mesh communications - localise as many steps in systems as possible, make 
transparent the connections using technology and knowledge networks.
4. be human together - integrate diversity, flatten hierarchies, listen and engage.
 
How Active Do We Get?
There are lots of ways and places where you can make a difference & where you can get active.
But if you are to be sustainable, you need to balance your personal capital and surplus.
Your work situation, physical life stage, family commitments, and mental health dictates your surplus - the 
amount of time, energy, and money you can spare, and the amount of stress you can absorb. This surplus will 
vary enormously as your situation changes, and as you become activism experienced. It is fine to temporarily 
use up some personal capital on a key or urgent project, but give yourself time and space to rebuild. Activism 
burn-out is a real thing. 
                          Capital - Surplus! !
!
!
!
Your Examples
Session 7 - page 2
Integrated Activism - demonstrating your 
activism by activities and behaviours at work, in 
the home, out shopping, your choice of clothes 
& transport - low surplus activities
Support Activism - giving time to volunteer in 
organised group activites - community gardens, 
fund raising events, working bees, social media 
networking - mid surplus activities
Engaged Activism - committed, scheduled time 
to volunteer in organised activities - repair 
cafes, litter campaigns, permablitz, food banks, 
rehabilitation events, film & information nights 
- high surplus activities 
Planned Activism - committed time as both 
organiser and volunteer in group activities - 
sustainability events, repair cafe & library of 
things team, protests & demonstrations 
- high surplus & eating into capital activities
background image
Tick any you have done, 
at any level of expertise:
beginner, amateur, expert 
Clothing         
[  ] Knit   
[  ] Spin / Card        
[  ] Dye              
[  ] Sew / Crochet               
[  ] Embroider / Quilt                  
[  ] Felting                
[  ] Warp a Loom 
[  ] Weave
Gardening          
[  ] Weed / Turn Soil  
[  ] Prune Trees & Bushes      
[  ] Graft Fruit Trees          
[  ] Plant Trees          
[  ] Build a Veg Garden          
[  ] Compost / Mulch         
[  ] Save Seeds          
[  ] Maintain Greenhouse          
[  ] Build a Herb Garden          
[  ] Use Medicinal Herbs          
[  ] Pick Berries          
[  ] Grow Mushrooms   
[  ] Make Wicking Beds
[  ] Watering Skills      
[  ] Permaculture Designer         
Transport          
[  ] Bicycle / Skateboard             
[  ] Walk / Hike          
[  ] Car Service / Repair     
Animal Husbandry          
[  ] Bees          
[  ] Chickens / Ducks 
[  ] Rabbits          
[  ] Worm Farm               
[  ] Catch & Clean Fish              
[  ] Milk a Cow/Goat          
[  ] Raise a Sheep / Goat
[  ] Shear / Fleece         
[  ] Raise a Pig / Cow       
Building          
[  ] Build / Renovate House          
[  ] Make Furniture          
[  ] Build Boats          
[  ] Build Music Instrument     
[  ] Wood Carving          
[  ] Hemp / Cob Building          
[  ] Ironwork / Welding          
[  ] Upholster / Leather        
Energy Use          
[  ] Light Retrofit a House          
[  ] Install Compost Toilet          
[  ] Wastewater systems          
[  ] Install Insulation          
[  ] Harvest Rainwater          
[  ] Manage Electricity Use        
[  ] Use a Windmill          
[  ] Design Passive Solar 
Food Preparation          
[  ] Cook Healthy Meals
[  ] Bake          
[  ] Make Butter / Cheese            
[  ] Dry or Can Fruit & Veg                
[  ] Make Jam & Sauces              
[  ] Brew Beer          
[  ] Make Wine               
[  ] Make Yogurt          
[  ] Maintain Sourdough                   
[  ] Smoke Meat, Fish                 
[  ] Use Solar Oven          
[  ] Make Juice          
[  ] Make Sausage          
[  ] Preserve in Brine          
[  ] Forage for Wild Food                          
[  ] Gather Mushrooms 
Household          
[  ] Blow Glass          
[  ] Make Pottery          
[  ] Make Soap          
[  ] Make Cleaning Stuff       
[  ] Make Lotions, Salves               
[  ] Make Brooms / Whisks                 
[  ] Make Baskets          
[  ] Make Rugs      
[  ] Make Candles                
[  ] Repair / Alter Clothing          
[  ] Darn Socks          
[  ] Mend / Make Shoes          
[  ] Repair / Sharpen Tools                
[  ] Repair Appliances          
[  ] Repair IT Electronics        
[  ] Repair Nets, Macrame          
[  ] Repair a Bike 
Outdoors          
[  ] Chop / Split Wood          
[  ] Fell a Tree          
[  ] Make Rope          
[  ] Build a Fence
[  ] Ride / Keep a Horse
[  ] Dig a Ditch / Channel 
Wellness          
[  ] Listening Partnership
[  ] Give Massages  
[  ] Natural Medicines        
[  ] Do Foot Reflexology          
[  ] Nurse the Sick          
[  ] Administer 1st Aid                 
[  ] Yoga / Fitness Training      
[  ] Energy Healing / Reiki          
[  ] Stress Management          
[  ] Administer CPR          
[  ] Pull a Tooth          
[  ] Assist at Childbirth 
Play / Creative         
[  ] Computer Games          
[  ] Cards / Board Games        
[  ] Music / Singing          
[  ] Theater / Dance         
[  ] Poetry  / Writing                
[  ] Art / Drawing             
[  ] Pottery / Sculpture          
[  ] Story-Telling          
[  ] Photography / Video                 
[  ] Team Sports 
     
Message          
[  ] Teach / Mentor         
[  ] Video / Social Media        
[  ] Raise Money / Grants         
[  ] Write / Journalism          
[  ] Lobby / Legal        
[  ] PR / Blogs               
[  ] Public Speaking 
Family       
[  ] Care for Infants         
[  ] Raise Children / Teens
[  ] Care for Elderly
[  ] Care for Disabled
[  ] Pet Animal / Bird Care 
[  ] Give Haircuts 
More...........
Session 7 - page 3
What Are Your Skills - What Might You Contribute
background image
Groups & Activite    
 [ TBA further insert links and pages here ]
 [ TBA link to Transition Australia Feedback on the Sessions Here ]
Session 7 - page 4
Suggested Session Plan
Catch Up - how has everyone’s week been?
10 min
Review Spill-Over - what surprised you? had you already used the power 
of modeling behaviour? 
30 min
Resilient Communities & Surplus - did this give you a framework for 
activism and help you find a sustainable activity balance?
20 min
Skills Audit  - were you surprised by the range of skills in your group?
30 min
Groups & Activities - suggest other groups and activities?
20 min 
Before you close Session 7, take time to reflect on how the session went, 
think of steps that might be taken in the next session, consider how the 
others are reacting and responding. Think Head, Hands, & Heart.
10 min
Extinction Rebellion
Fridays for Future -
        Persistent Presence 
School Strike 4 Climate
350.org
Get-Up
Avaaz.org
RenewEconomy
Friends of The Earth
Town Teams - 
     Street Teams
Permaculture - Permablitz
Repair Cafe Australia
Street Library - Little Library  Boomerang Bags
Melbourne Free University
- Brisbane Free University
Time Banking
Community Gardens
background image
NOTES
background image
How to Use this Handbook
This handbook  part of a collection of resources and articles created by the team 
at Transition Towns Australia. The reference points like this one [1.1]  mean there 
is more information and links to resources, groups, and activities on our website.
www.transitionaustralia.net
 
There are two ways to find them.
Quick Link - put the item number into Search       3.12
or
Go to 
Resources
, then 
Transition Streets
, and browse the entire resource bank.
Comments & Feedback
  - this Handbook, and the Collection of Articles and Resources are 
constantly being revised and updated. If you have any suggestions or criticisms, please email us 
on -  
info@transitionaustralia.net
   If you would like to use this Handbook in your own area, start your 
own group, or even modify the Handbook for your community, we are there to help. This version of 
the Handbook is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-Alike 4.0
Acknowledgements
 - This version of the Transition Streets Handbook was inspired by previous 
editions published in Australia, the UK, and the USA.  Special thanks to the Transition Newcastle 
(NSW) and Transition Streets National Working Group (NSW and VIC) - Aaron Hodgson, Alicia 
Martin , Allan Evans, Ben Ewald, Cathy Stuart, Christine Bruderlin, Emily Grace, George Stuart , 
Gillian Harris, Graeme Stuart, Hunter Water , John Merory, Julie French , Karen Toikens, Lesley 
Edwards, Liza Pezzano, Mary Stringer, Maureen Beckett, Max Wright, Rebecca Tyndall, Rosemary 
Nugent, Tom Danby, Tony Proust, and William Vorobioff.
Creative Commons Copyright 2020 
Transition Towns Australian Inc 
info@transitionaustralia.net