background image
background image
Australia Year by Year
1810 to 1845: From the Macquarie
Era to Ending Transportation
by Victoria Macleay
ISBN 978 086427 272 0
Published in electronic format by
Trocadero Publishing
GPO Box 1546
Sydney NSW 2001
Australia
ABN 28 003 214 748
contact@trocadero.com.au
www.trocadero.com.au
Created and produced in Australia
Copyright © 2012 S and L Brodie
The information in this eBook was
current at the time of  writing
IMPORTANT NOTICE
This work is protected under
Australian and international
copyright laws and conventions. No
part of  this work may be copied,
duplicated, saved to another
system, stored in any electronic or
other system, or reproduced in any
shape or form without the written
permission of  the copyright owners
and the publisher. This copy is
licensed only to the purchaser and
may not be passed on to any other
person or organisation in electronic,
printed, or any other form.
By accessing this eBook you are bound by
international copyright laws. Any unauthorised
use, copying, duplication, resale, broadcast,
diffusion, saving to another system, storage in
any electronic or other system, in any shape or
form, is not permitted. Any breach of these
terms will be subject to civil prosecution.
Distributed by
Dewilde Books
3 Charles Street
T 0425 711 935
Coburg North VIC 3058
twdanby@gmail.com
ABN 99 461 194 554
www.dewildebooks.com.au
This edition is licensed to

 YOUR SCHOOL NAME HERE

This is a sample version of the HTML e-books

For more information go here
AUSTRALIAN TIMELINES
The Governors 1788–1850
Immigration Since 1788
Prime Ministers and Their Governments
The Constitution: 
The Document that Created the Nation
Exploration and Settlement in Colonial Australia
The Commonwealth of Australia: 
Evolving into a Nation
Gold: Instant Wealth and Long-term Prosperity
Convicts: The Story of the Penal Settlements 
that Created Australia
The States: Their Place in Federal Australia
About the Money: Australia’s Economic History
Australia at the Time of Federation
The Industrial Revolution and 
its Impact on Australia *
How Communications United Australia *
ASIA-PACIFIC TIMELINES
European Colonialism in the Asia-Pacific
ASIA-PACIFIC RELATIONS
Australia’s Pacific Neighbours
Australia’s Asian Neighbours
Japan: The Story of the Nation
China: The Story of the Nation
India: The Story of the Nation *
AUSTRALIAN DECADES
The 1950s: Building a New Australia
The 1960s: Reshaping Australian Society
THE NATIONAL IDENTITY
Faiths, Religions, Beliefs in Modern Australia
Australian Origins 
Volume 1: Afghanistan to Italy
Volume 2: Japan to Zimbabwe
Immigrants Who Changed Australia *
AUSTRALIAN SOCIETY
Influencing Australia
The Way We Were: The Way We Are Now *
LINKING THE NATION
Australia’s Airlines: 
How the Skies Were Conquered
Australia’s Railways: 
How the Land Was Conquered
DEFENDING AUSTRALIA
World War I: The Australian Experience
World War II: The Australian Experience
The Cold War: Australia in Korea, Malaya, Vietnam
* Please check www.trocadero.com.au for publication date
Other Trocadero series
eBook versions available for schools
AUSTRALIA YEAR BY YEAR
Other books in this series
1788 to 1809: From First Fleet to 
Rum Rebellion
background image
1810
2
1811
5
1812
6
1813
7
1814
8
1815
9
1816
11
1817
12
1818
13
1819
14
1820
15
1821
16
1822
17
1823
19
1824
20
1825
22
1826
23
1827
24
1828
25
1829
27
1830
29
1831
30
1832
31
1833
32
1834
33
1835
34
1836
35
1837
37
1838
38
1839
39
1840
40
1841
41
1842
43
1843
44
1844
45
1845
46
For links to websites of interest, please go to
www.trocadero.com.au/yy1810
THE YEAR 1810 marked a major change in the
development of Australia. The chaos of the first 22 years
ended with the swearing-in of Lachlan Macquarie as
Governor of New South Wales on 1 January. No longer
would a gang of serving and former Army officers decide
the fate of the colony.
The years from 1810 to 1845 would see social upheaval
as the world began to change. At the beginning, the 1810s
was the decade when a ramshackle penal colony was
transformed into a solid and prosperous outpost of the
British Empire. Governor Macquarie’s major
infrastructure program transformed places like Sydney
Town, although he received little thanks in the end.
Macquarie actively promoted the cause of the
emancipists — convicts who had served their time and
were now free — by putting them on the same social
plane as the exclusives — the former Army officers and
free settlers who believed they were the elite of the
colony. The outrage of the exclusives led to Macquarie’s
downfall at the hands of a biased royal commissioner.
Over these 36 years the lust for land continued to grow.
Squatters moved illegally onto Crown land in the hope
they could eventually take possession of it. The government
halted free land grants; those who wanted more land were
made to pay for it and the funds were used to finance
more free immigrants. Squatters from Van Diemen’s
Land forced the Port Phillip district to be opened up to
settlement, paving the way for the development of
Victoria. South Australia was created as a convict-free
province in a bold social experiment.
As wide-ranging social transformation swept through
Britain, the Australian colonies began to change as well.
These years are marked by a new social awareness,
liberal attitudes, and demands for self government. By
1846 the reason the colonies had come into being —
convict transportation — would be coming to an end.
Edited by Lynn Brodie
ISBN 978 086427 272 0
Copyright © 2012 S and L Brodie
All rights reserved
Published by Trocadero Publishing
GPO Box 1546  Sydney NSW 2001  Australia
www.trocadero.com.au
Produced in Australia
Index
48
background image
1810
2
ON 
1 JANUARY
Lieutenant Colonel
Lachlan Macquarie was officially sworn in as
Governor of New South Wales. This was a
pivotal moment in the history of Australia.
He was the first governor from the ranks of
the Army rather than the Royal Navy.
Previously, antagonism between the Navy
governors and the New South Wales Corps
had been a considerable problem.
Macquarie was a career soldier with
decades of experience in both combat and
administration in India, Egypt and Britain.
With him from England came the 73rd
Regiment of Foot, his own army unit, to
replace the hopelessly corrupt and discredited
New South Wales Corps.
It would be Macquarie’s job to clean up
the wreckage left by the deposing of Governor
Bligh in January 1808. His greatest tasks were
to restore normality, legal standards, and a
sense of moral purpose to the penal colony.
Macquarie took swift action on
4 January
to reassure the population that
the times had changed. Almost all official
actions since Bligh was deposed were
overturned. Anyone appointed to an official
position while the New South Wales Corps
was in charge lost their job. Those who had
been dismissed from positions regained
their jobs. Land grants made to members of
the Corps were cancelled and all criminal
and civil trials were nullified.
Lachlan Macquarie
Other 
notable events
Lieutenant T A Crane
replaced John Piper as
commandant of Norfolk
Island on 
10 April
.
The first recorded
horse race in New
South Wales was run
on 
21 April
.
With Macquarie’s
support, this was
followed up with a
week of horse racing
in 
October
.
On 
13 June
Matthew
Flinders, who had
contibuted so much to
the exploration of
Australia, was released
from French custody on
Mauritius. He had been
held there, supposedly
for spying, since 1803.
The first Congregational
Church was established
at Sydney by William
Crook in 
August
.
Macquarie takes over
background image
MORAL STANDARDS in New South
Wales were a major concern for the
government in London. For various reasons,
large numbers of couples never got around
to marrying. For some it was a matter of the
lack of any clergyman other than from the
Church of England. For others it was just a
matter of convenience.
Macquarie launched a campaign to raise
moral standards, to encourage those living
together without the benefit of marriage to
make their unions official. On 
24 February
the new Governor issued a proclamation
condemning cohabitation, encouraging those
doing so to be married as soon as possible.
Macquarie’s words had some effect by
the end of 1810. There was a substantial
rise in the number of marriages, and
church attendance had increased as well.
FORMER GOVERNOR William Bligh
had spent much of the two years since his
removal from office on 26 January 1808
aboard HMS
Porpoise, anchored in the
Derwent Estuary in Van Diemen’s Land.
Upon hearing of Macquarie’s arrival,
Bligh quickly set sail for Sydney Town,
arriving on 
17 January
.
For almost four months Bligh busied
himself assembling a case against those
who had deposed him. His presence in the
colony was a nuisance to Macquarie, who
was trying to return New South Wales
to some form of normality and balance.
On 
12 May
he finally departed Sydney
Town in HMS
Hindoostan. With him he
took Richard Atkins and William Gore, two
former officials who had suffered badly under
the regime of the New South Wales
Corps. They would be his principal
witnesses in the court martial of
Major George Johnston, commander
of the soldiers who arrested Bligh.
Hindoostan travelled in convoy
with HMS
Porpoise and
HMS
Dromedary carrying the
majority of the Corps soldiers
returning to England. There they
would revert to their official title
of 102nd Regiment of Foot. After
20 years in the Australian climate,
most were unprepared for the
rigours of British weather. Large
numbers of soldiers and their
families died of influenza, pneumonia
or tuberculosis during their first winter
at home.
Corps commander Lieutenant Colonel
William Paterson, who had not taken
part in the Rum Rebellion, sailed in
HMS
Dromedary. A weak leader who was
more interested in natural history than
soldiering, he died aboard ship as they
were nearing Cape Horn.
MACQUARIE TOOK an enlightened
view on emancipists, those convicts who
were now free after their terms of
imprisonment had expired. He believed
they should be reinstated to the social
positions they had enjoyed in Britain
before their convictions. The Governor’s
policies were set out in a letter to Colonial
Secretary Lord Castlereagh in 
April
.
Macquarie believed many emancipists
had qualifications that were essential to
building the colony. In coming years he would
3
Emancipation
Ending the Bligh era
The morals campaign
Former Governor 
William Bligh
Lieutenant Colonel 
William Paterson
A typical rural property
during the Macquarie era
background image
appoint many to official positions or give
them official encouragement. He began by
appointing Andrew Thompson as Justice of
the Peace in the Hawkesbury district, the
first emancipist to rise to such a position.
Macquarie’s attitude would generate
considerable friction with free settlers and
the military, who disagreed with the
rehabilitation of convicts.
THE QUALITY of medical care in Sydney
Town was poor when Macquarie arrived. 
The settlement’s hospital was a collection
of tents and shoddy temporary buildings
beside Sydney Cove. He planned to erect
a substantial hospital building on a new
roadway, now called Macquarie Street;
however,  the  government  in  London
refused to fund the project.
Undeterred, Macquarie entered into
a contract with Garnham Blaxcell and
Alexander  Riley  on 
6 November
to
construct the hospital. In return they were 
WITH THE population expanding,
both with free settlers and
emancipists, Macquarie established a
number of new towns in 
December
to
cater for the demand for land
settlement. Five of these — Richmond,
Windsor, Pitt Town, Wilberforce and
Castlereagh — were located to the north-
west, around the Hawkesbury River. The
other, Campbelltown, was located to the
south-west. It was named after Elizabeth,
the Governor’s wife, whose maiden name
was Campbell.
A convict gang returns after a
day mining slate. Most convicts
were put to work on hard
labouring projects, but some with
special talents were given work
more suited to their abilities.
Port Jackson in 1810
The Rum Hospital
New towns
David Collins,
Lieutenant-Governor of
Van Diemen’s Land, died
suddenly in Hobart on
24 March. He had been
in charge of the penal
settlement since 1804.
awarded a monopoly on the import of
liquor into the colony from which they
expected to easily recoup their costs.
The contract allowed them to import
up to 227 000 litres of ‘rum’, the generic
term for most spirits at the time.
Large numbers of convict labourers
would be provided free to work on
the construction.
New South Wales Parliament
House in Sydney. This building
was originally the northern wing
of the Rum Hospital.
4
background image
5
Secretary of State 
for the Colonies, 
Lord Castlereagh
1811
OF ALL those who had manipulated
Johnston, none was more guilty than John
Macarthur, a former officer of the New
South Wales Corps who had grown wealthy
on land grants. The Rum Rebellion had been
triggered by the ongoing dispute between
Macarthur and Governor Bligh.
Macarthur returned to England with
Johnston to face a possible trial for treason.
It soon became clear that any such trial
would have to be held in Sydney. Colonial
Secretary Lord Castlereagh advised Macquarie
in 
June
that, if Macarthur returned to New
South Wales, he was to be arrested and
tried. For a number of years Macarthur
remained in England, working to have the
threat of arrest removed.
FOLLOWING THE appointment of
Thomas Davey as Lieutenant-Governor,
Macquarie toured various locations in Van
Diemen’s Land during 
November
and
December
. At Hobart Town he approved
the survey plan for streets and allotments,
and agreed to the naming of Macquarie
Street after himself and Elizabeth Street
after his wife.
MAJOR GEORGE Johnston of the New
South Wales Corps had led the troops who
deposed Governor William Bligh in 1808.
Having been ordered back to England,
Johnston faced a court martial in 
May
. On
5 July
he was found guilty of mutiny and
sentenced to be cashiered out of the Army.
Although this meant he was discharged
in disgrace, it was a relatively mild
punishment for such a substantial offence.
General opinion at the time was that he had
been manipulated by others, and the
punishment reflected this. He was permitted
to return to Sydney, where he lived at
Annandale until his death.
Other 
notable events
The turnpike road
between Sydney and
Parramatta was opened
on 
10 April
, with toll
booths at both ends.
Major Thomas Davey
was appointed
Lieutenant-Governor of
Van Diemen’s Land on
1 September
.
Governor Macquarie
laid the foundation
stone of the Rum
Hospital on 
23 October
.
William C Wentworth
became the first
Australian-born Acting
Provost Marshal on
26 October
.
Samuel Marsden
exported 1800 kg of
wool to England on
2 December
.
Macarthur in exile
Johnston’s court martial
Macquarie on tour
John Macarthur
background image
THE VAN Diemen’s Land settlement was
officially part of New South Wales,
administered by a Lieutenant-Governor in
Hobart Town. Convicts sent to the settlement
were dispatched from Sydney Town
following their arrival from England.
On 
19 October
there was an exception
to this when the ship 
Indefatigable arrived
with 199 convicts on board, direct from
England. It was the first such shipment, and
the last for at least eight years.
1812
Other 
notable events
John Oxley was
appointed Surveyor-
General of the colony
on 
1 January
.
During 
March
George
Evans made yet another
attempt to cross the
Blue Mountains. After
being forced to turn
back he explored the
Illawarra region, opening
it up for settlement.
On 
22 December
Philip
Parker King and Allan
Cunningham passed
Cape Leeuwin as they
began their survey of
the western coast of
the continent.
Henry Lord Bathurst
became Colonial
Secretary in London.
6
Places named after the Macquaries
Lachlan Macquarie
Macquarie Street, Sydney
Macquarie Street, Hobart
Macquarie Place, Sydney
Fort Macquarie, Sydney
Macquarie River
Lachlan River
Port Macquarie
Macquarie Marshes
Macquarie University
Macquarie Harbour
Macquarie Island
Lake Macquarie
Macquarie Hill
Macquarie Pass
Macquarie Lighthouse, Sydney
Macquarie Fields, Sydney
Macquarie Park, Sydney
Macquarie, ACT
Macquarie electorate
Macquarie Hospital
Elizabeth (Campbell) Macquarie
Elizabeth Street, Sydney
Elizabeth Street, Hobart
Elizabeth Bay, Sydney
Campbelltown, NSW
Campbell Town, Tasmania
Mrs Macquarie’s Road, Sydney
Mrs Macquarie’s Point, Sydney
George Evans
Elizabeth Macquarie
To Van Diemen’s Land
Transportation inquiry
THE BRITISH House of Commons appointed
a Select Committee to consider the value of
the system of transporting convicts to New
South Wales and how it could be improved.
Its report to parliament on 
10 July
gave
general approval to policies being followed
by Governor Macquarie. It did, however,
criticise the number of tickets of leave issued
to convicts still serving their sentences, and
recommended against the Governor having
the power to grant pardons to convicts. This,
the committee maintained, should remain
under the control of the Colonial Office or
the Parliament.
There was general approval of Macquarie’s
plans to improve the colonial economy in
order to attract free settlers and provide
work for convicts. Convicts would continue
to be encouraged to apply for land grants
once they had completed their sentences.
background image
BY 1812 Macquarie was facing a critical
shortage of good agricultural land. Most of
the Cumberland Plains — the region around
Sydney Town — had been allocated. The
solution, most believed, lay to the west,
beyond the great barrier known as the Blue
Mountains. It had resisted all European
attempts to cross it since 1788.
To tackle the problem the Governor
commissioned three men with good
knowledge of the region: businessman
Gregory Blaxland, surveyor William Lawson,
and Provost Marshal and former jockey
William C Wentworth.
On 
11 May
, accompanied by four convict
servants, four horses and five dogs, they set
out from South Creek and headed west.
Blaxland’s tactic was to climb to the tops of
the ridges and advance along them. They
travelled between three and eight kilometres
each day, despite the rugged landscape.
By 
28 May
they had reached the end of a
mountain spur, later called Mount York,
from where they worked their way down
From left:
Gregory Blaxland
William Lawson
William C Wentworth
Crossing the barrier
7
1813
Other 
notable events
On 
30 March
former
Major George Johnston
arrived back in Sydney
Town having been
cashiered from the
British Army as a result
of his leadership of the
Rum Rebellion in 1808.
A group of convicts
escaped on 
23 April
by
seizing the schooner
Unity at Hobart Town.
They were never heard
of again.
Having become
dissatisfied with the
performance of the
73rd Regiment, on
31 July
Governor
Macquarie asked for
them to be recalled.
The NSW Society for
Promoting Christian
Knowledge was
established on 
8 May
at a meeting chaired
by Edward Smith Hall.
through treacherous scrub into a fertile
valley. After crossing a river they arrived at
what is now Mount Blaxland. The first and
most significant part of the barrier had been
conquered. They returned quickly to Sydney
to inform Macquarie.
It was left to experienced explorer
George Evans to complete the job. On
19 November
his party of five departed,
following the route west forged by Blaxland,
Lawson and Wentworth.
From Mount Blaxland he trekked
alongside the Fish River west to where it
joins the Campbell River and the two become
the Macquarie River. Travelling a further
30 kilometres, Evans was able to confirm
the existence of fine grassland country ideal
for grazing.
background image
received a multi-cannon salute. After
Macquarie obliged him and he came ashore,
Bent was eventually sworn in on 
12 August
.
For the rest of the year Bent was in
conflict with Macquarie about his prestige
and standing in the colony. He protested
that the accommodation Macquarie offered
for the Supreme Court did not reflect its
dignity. In the end London directed that
Macquarie’s word would be final in this
matter. Bent eventually had to settle for
rooms in the new Rum Hospital building.
The conflict between Governor and Chief
Justice had only just begun.
ONCE GEORGE Evans had forged the
track over the Blue Mountains the previous
year, the pressure was on Governor
Macquarie to open up the lands beyond.
On 
14 June
he commissioned William Cox
to construct a road along the route
LETTERS PATENT were issued in Britain
on 
4 February
for what became known as
the Second Charter of Justice of New South
Wales. This replaced the original charter
enacted in 1787 when the First Fleet was
due to sail.
The new Charter provided for three
courts, the highest being the Supreme
Court. It had jurisdiction over all parts of
the colony, including Van Diemen’s Land.
The next level, the Governor’s Court,
excluded Van Diemen’s Land, which was
covered by the Lieutenant-Governor’s Court.
The new Charter particularly addressed
a number of problems for Van Diemen’s
Land. Previously, justice had been
administered by magistrates with limited
powers in both civil and criminal cases. Those
wanting to lodge appeals had had to make
the expensive journey to Sydney Town to
appear before a higher civil court and those
charged with criminal offences had been
shipped to Sydney Town to face trial.
ON 
7 FEBRUARY
, in London, Jeffery Hart
Bent was appointed Chief Justice of the
new Supreme Court on a salary of £800
[about $85 000]. Before he departed he made
it clear to the Colonial Secretary that he
was disappointed at not being given a
knighthood to go with the appointment.
When Bent arrived at Port Jackson on
28 July
, Governor Macquarie knew
immediately he had a problem on his
hands. Bent refused to leave his ship and
report to Government House until he
New courts of law
Justice Bent
Cox’s road
1814
Other 
notable events
On 
11 February
the
46th Regiment,
commanded by
Lieutenant Colonel
George Molle, arrived
to replace the 73rd
Regiment, which
departed for Ceylon on
5 April
.
John Pascoe Fawkner
was sentenced to 500
lashes and three years
jail on 
23 August
for
assisting convicts to
escape from Van
Diemen’s Land.
On 
28 December
Governor Macquarie
convened a meeting of
indigenous people in
the hope that conflicts
with the settlers could
be resolved.
Matthew Flinders
(below) published his
major work, A Voyage
to Terra Australis, in
London, and proposed
the name ‘Australia’
for the continent.
Officers of the 46th
Regiment established
the colony’s first
Freemasons’ Lodge.
Jeffery Hart Bent, the Chief Justice
who put his own prestige ahead of
the rule of law in New South Wales
8
background image
WILLIAM COX made remarkable progress
with his road to the Bathurst Plains,
commenced in 1814. By 
14 January
it had
descended from the Great Dividing Range
and reached the banks of the Macquarie
River. In recognition of their efforts, the 30
convicts who laboured on the road were
given pardons by the Governor.
During 
April
Macquarie, accompanied by
Cox, set out on a nine-day tour to the newly
discovered regions. On returning to Sydney,
the Governor announced on 
7 May
that a
settlement would be established as the centre
of the new grazing region. It was named after
Lord Bathurst, the long-serving Colonial
Secretary in London. The move west now
began in earnest.
labourers with reputations as hard workers.
In the record time of six months they would
carve the new roadway through the difficult
landscape for 163 kilometres, constructing
more than a dozen bridges along the way.
Even the perilous descent from Mount York
down to the Bathurst Plains was achieved
without any serious injuries.
THE PENAL station on Norfolk Island had
been set up in 1788 with the idea of growing
flax for use in making ropes and sails for
Royal Navy ships. Since then it had gained a
dubious reputation as a place of severe
punishment and tyrannical commandants.
Having reached a peak of 1000, the population
had gradually dwindled to less than 200 by
1808. In 1813 a decision had been made, largely
because of costs, to abandon Norfolk Island.
The last convicts departed on 
28 February
.
Farewell Norfolk Island
The way to Bathurst
Norfolk Island
Blaxland, Lawson, Wentworth and Evans
had pioneered.
Cox was well known as a property
developer in the Windsor region, having
created a number of the town’s better quality
structures. He assembled a team of 30 convict
1815
9
A section of Cox’s road across the Blue Mountains
background image
CHIEF JUSTICE of the Supreme Court,
Jeffery Bent, continued to antagonise
Macquarie. In keeping with his policy of
encouraging emancipists — convicts who
had completed their sentences — Macquarie
recommended in 
April
that George Crossley
and Edward Eagar be admitted to practice as
barristers before the Supreme Court. Bent saw
this as an insult to the dignity of the court
and refused to admit the ‘convict attorneys’.
Ellis Bent, Jeffery’s brother, had arrived
on the same ship as Macquarie in 1809 to be
Judge-Advocate in the Governor’s Court. In
general he had been more accommodating
than his pompous sibling; however, after
Jeffery’s arrival, Ellis also adopted the anti-
emancipist line. On 
8 May
he refused to allow
emancipist attorneys to appear before him.
After many suggestions from the Governor
that he should begin earning his salary,
Jeffery Bent finally deigned to open the
Supreme Court on 
1 May
. He then objected
to Macquarie’s nominees as magistrates,
William Broughton and Alexander Riley,
who would sit on the bench with Bent. He
closed the court down rather than face the
possibility of being overruled in a 2:1 majority.
In 
September
Bent became a laughing
stock by refusing to pay the toll on a turnpike
road because he (wrongly) thought it was
illegal. He was fined £2 by Justice of the Peace
D’Arcy Wentworth.
Other 
notable events
Lieutenant-Governor
Davey declared martial
law in Van Diemen’s
Land on 
25 April
when
bushranger Michael
Howe and his gang
killed two settlers at
New Norfolk.
George Evans explored
further west. On
25 May
he discovered
and named the
Lachlan River.
On 
10 August
Wesleyan
minister Samuel Leigh
arrived at Sydney Town
to establish the colony’s
first Methodist Church.
The British East India
Company’s trade
monopoly for New South
Wales was terminated.
Ellis Bent, Judge Advocate
in the Governor’s Court
and brother of Jeffery
In 1810
Sweden declared war on
Britain on 
17 November
.
On 
3 December
British
forces seized Réunion and
Mauritius from France.
In 1811
Austria declared itself
bankrupt on 
20 February
.
Percy Bysshe Shelley was
sent down from Oxford on
25 March
for publishing a
pamphlet on atheism.
Paraguay became
independent on 
14 May
.
In 1812
French forces captured
Germany on 
9 January
.
On 
19 January
British forces
stormed Ciudad Rodrigo in
the Peninsular War.
French forces under
Napoleon invaded Russia
on 
12 June
.
The USA declared war on
Britain on 
18 June
.
On 
14 September
Napoleon’s French Army
entered Moscow, then began
to retreat on 19 October.
A US invasion of Canada
was repelled on 
13 October
.
In 1813
Pride and Prejudice, by Jane
Austen, was published on
28 January
.
Simon Bolivar liberated
Venezuela on 
23 May
.
The Prussian Army repelled
the French on 
23 August
.
In 1814
A volcano on Luzon in the
Philippines erupted, killing
1200 people, on 
1 February
.
British and Allied forces
defeated Napoleon and
captured Paris on 
31 March
.
The Treaty of Paris was
signed on 
30 May
, following
the restoration of the
French monarchy.
The Netherlands handed
the Cape Colony to Britain
on 
13 August
.
The US–British War of
1812 was ended by the
Treaty of Ghent, signed on
24 December
.
In 1815
After escaping from Elba,
Napoleon entered Paris on
20 March
.
Thirty-nine states united to
become the German
Confederation on 
8 June
.
Napoleon’s army was
defeated at the Battle of
Waterloo on 
18 June
.
In 1816
Argentina declared its
independence from Spain
on 
9 July
.
The Netherlands regained
control of Sumatra from
Britain on 
10 December
.
Legal concerns
10
Around the world
Exasperated, Macquarie wrote to Lord
Bathurst in London requesting that both
Bent brothers be recalled. If they were not,
Macquarie stated, he would tender his
resignation as Governor.
Ellis Bent had antagonised the Governor
when, prompted by Jeffery, he refused to
amend the port regulations as requested by
Macquarie. Ellis pre-empted his dismissal
when he died on 
10 November
after a long
illness. The stand-off between Macquarie
and Jeffery Bent continued.
background image
AS PART of his policy of encouraging
emancipists, Macquarie sought out talented
convicts whose abilities he could use in
building the colony. The most famous of
these was Francis Greenway. Originally an
architect with a practice in Bristol, England,
Greenway had been sentenced to death in
1812 for forging a document. After this was
commuted to 14 years transportation, he
had arrived at Sydney in February 1814.
Rather than labouring with other convicts,
Greenway was given the freedom to continue
as an architect. Macquarie commissioned
him to review the construction of the Rum
Hospital. His scathing report forced the
builders to make expensive alterations to
improve the quality of the structure.
After a number of minor jobs, Greenway
was appointed as the colony’s Civil Architect
on 
30 March
. His first assignment was the
design and construction of a new lighthouse,
called the Macquarie Tower, at Dover
Heights in Sydney. It was the beginning of a
very successful collaboration between
Governor and architect.
IN 
JANUARY
the Colonial Secretary, Lord
Bathurst, sided with Macquarie over the
question of the behaviour of the Bent brothers,
largely because Jeffery Bent would close the
court when he did not get his own way, and
because of his defiance of the Governor.
Despite knowing he was likely to be
dismissed, Bent continued in his role as Chief
Justice, although he rarely sat in court.
Residing in his dead brother’s house, he gave
legal advice to those opposed to Macquarie.
Bent recalled
Greenway appointed
Francis Greenway was
commissioned to design
and build the Macquarie
Tower lighthouse at
Dover Heights on
Sydney’s South Head
1816
He jailed the magistrate William
Broughton for contempt of court in a case
involving employment of a convict cook who
had previously been a servant of Ellis Bent.
This generated outrage, with the Lieutenant-
Governor, acting Judge-Advocate and all
magistrates except the anti-Macquarie
Reverend Samuel Marsden declaring it a
breach of the British Constitution and
disrespectful to the Governor.
On 
5 October
John Wylde arrived in the
colony to take up the position of Judge-
Advocate. He brought with him Lord
Bathurst’s order recalling Bent, which Bent
ignored when he resumed his seat in the
Supreme Court on 
1 December
.
Macquarie retaliated by relieving the two
magistrates Riley and Broughton of their
positions in the court. Bent then ordered
Provost-Marshal William Gore to arrest
Riley, which he refused to do.
On 
11 December
an angry Macquarie
issued an order relieving Bent of his position
and declaring he no longer had any
jurisdiction or authority.
BRITAIN HAD made little provision for
commercial procedures when it established
New South Wales as a penal colony. It was
this, in part, that led to the use of rum as a
medium of payment when insufficient hard
currency was available.
Other 
notable events
Macquarie’s punitive
expedition on 
10 April
to deal with Aborigines
who had killed four
settlers near Nepean
resulted in 14
indigenous deaths.
The first free settlers
in Van Diemen’s Land
arrived 
20 September
.
A new trade exporting
horses to India began
on 
30 November
.
The opening up of the
Illawarra region began
on 
2 December
with
the first land grants in
the region.
Government House at
Parramatta was rebuilt
and expanded on
Macquarie’s orders.
11
Bank of New South Wales
background image
Eventually he was shipped off to various
colonies in the Caribbean, where he caused
similar mayhem to that in Sydney Town.
JOHN MACARTHUR’S exile from New
South Wales ended on 
30 September
when
he arrived at Port Jackson in the ship 
Lord
Eldon, accompanied by sons James and
William. His return was opposed by many,
but he had been able to negotiate a
compromise on the understanding that he
take no part in the public life of the colony.
ALTHOUGH JEFFERY Bent had been
officially cut off from the New South Wales
judicial system since December 1816, he
remained in the colony until 
18 May
. His
replacement as Chief Justice of the Supreme
Court, Barron Field, arrived to take up his
duties on 
24 February
.
Back in England, Bent began a campaign
against Macquarie, declaring that he would
bring him before the courts if he ever set foot
in the country. Bent even tried to have himself
appointed Governor of New South Wales.
Elizabeth Farm, the lush
estate owned by John
and Elizabeth Macarthur
Last of the Bents
Macarthur returns
Other 
notable events
The Bank of New South
Wales opened for
business in Macquarie
Place on 
8 April
.
On 
8 April
Colonel
William Sorrel was
sworn in as Lieutenant-
Governor of Van
Diemen’s Land.
Between 
28 April
and
29 August
Surveyor-
General John Oxley,
with George Evans,
followed the course of
the Lachlan River until
impenetrable marshes
blocked their way.
Father Jeremiah
O’Flynn arrived to
become Catholic
Prefect-Apostolic on
9 November
, but his
presence was not
approved by the
Colonial Office.
Macquarie
recommended the
name ‘Australia’ to the
Colonial Office on
21 December
.
1817
Realising this needed to change if the
colony were to develop, Macquarie
encouraged a group of entrepreneurs to
form a bank. On 
20 November
they met in
Sydney, and subsequent public meetings
were held in 
December
for those interested
in subscribing capital to the venture. It
became known as the Bank of New South
Wales [Westpac].
12
Lieutenant Colonel
Lachlan Macquarie
Born 31 January 1762
Died
1 July 1824
Governor of New South Wales
1 January 1810 to 1 December 1821
Saw service in the American Revolutionary
War as a member of the 84th Regiment.
Posted to Jamaica in the early 1780s.
From 1788 to 1807 was a member of the
77th Regiment in India and Egypt, as
well as holding posts in London.
Became Lieutenant Colonel of the 73rd
Regiment in 1808 prior to its move to
New South Wales.
background image
THE YEAR began with almost open warfare
between the Church of England’s Reverend
Samuel Marsden and Governor Macquarie.
On 
8 January
the Governor accused Marsden
of leading a campaign against him by sending
letters of complaint to London. He banned
Marsden from Government House.
Much of the enmity between the two
came from Macquarie’s determination to
treat emancipists as equals of free settlers in
Sydney society. On 
28 March
the parson
was removed from his role as Justice of the
Peace and magistrate.
The other religious figure causing trouble
in Macquarie’s eyes was Father Jeremiah
O’Flynn of the Catholic Church. O’Flynn
was in Sydney unofficially, his presence not
year he also began work on what would
stand as one of his great masterpieces:
St Matthew’s Church at Windsor.
RELATIONS BETWEEN Governor and
Colonial Office deteriorated in the latter
years of the 1810s. Macquarie became
disturbed and insulted by some of the
criticisms coming from Lord Bathurst,
the Colonial Secretary.
On appointment, Macquarie had
been guaranteed a pension if he
remained in the post eight years. With
this in mind, on 
1 December
he sent a
dispatch to London containing his
resignation to take effect the following
year. Its reception in London and the
response became part of a catalogue of
misunderstandings in the years to come.
This commitment lasted just a short time
after he went to live with his wife, Elizabeth,
on Elizabeth Farm at Parramatta. Macarthur
quickly developed a dislike for Macquarie,
despite the Governor’s having been very
helpful to him and his family. It was primarily
Macquarie’s refusal of further land grants
that turned Macarthur into an enemy.
BY THIS time the convicted forger turned
Civil  Architect  for  the  colony,  Francis
Greenway,  was  busily  engaged  in  a
number  of  projects  for  Macquarie.
Construction  of  the  new  lighthouse  at
Dover Heights progressed satisfactorily,
with  all  the  stonework  complete  by
December
.  Macquarie  was  so  pleased
that he recommended a conditional pardon
for Greenway on 
16 December
. During the 
Governor and Church
13
1818
Other 
notable events
The first Australia Day
celebration was held
on 
26 January
.
Public floggings were
ended and all such
punishments were
performed within
barracks at specific
times of the week.
Reverend Samuel Marsden
Greenway’s projects
Macquarie’s pension
Lieutenant-Governor
William Sorrel of 
Van Diemen’s Land
background image
he turned north-east to the Castlereagh River
then crossed the Warrumbungle Ranges.
From there he descended onto the vast
and fertile Liverpool Plains, discovering a
stream he called the Peel River. The group
trekked across what became known as the
New England Tableland to where Walcha is
located today.
Descending east through rugged landscape,
Oxley encountered the Hastings River and
followed it to the ocean. On 
25 September
he named the region at
the river’s mouth
Port Macquarie.
having received official approval from the
Colonial Office.
He spent much of his time preaching to
Irish convicts and soldiers. Macquarie saw
this as likely to inflame tensions between the
British and Irish communities. He deported
O’Flynn to England on 
15 May
.
AFTER HIS earlier journeys inland proved
inconclusive, on 
28 May
Surveyor-General
John Oxley, accompanied by George Evans,
set out to examine the Macquarie River.
On 
6 July
he was forced to turn back when
he reached impenetrable marshland. Instead,
14
The Warrumbungles
region was traversed by
John Oxley (right) during
his epic expedition
1819
Commission to report on
Macquarie’s compassionate
attitude towards convicts in
New South Wales. The former
Chief Justice of Trinidad, John
Thomas Bigge, was chosen to
lead the inquiry.
Bigge arrived at Port Jackson
on 
26 September
in the ship
ON 
5 JANUARY
Colonial Secretary Lord
Bathurst established a Royal Commission to
inquire into the effectiveness of transportation
as a deterrent to crime in Britain. The
government wanted the threat of
transportation to strike fear into the hearts
of all criminals. He specifically directed the
Royal Commissioner
John Thomas Bigge
Oxley’s great journey
Macquarie versus Bigge
background image
15
John Barry. Macquarie had only received
notice of the Royal Commission a short
time before. He had not yet received any
acknowledgement of his request to Bathurst
to be relieved from his post, so assumed
Bigge’s arrival was Bathurst’s response. In
fact, the Colonial Secretary had written
some time earlier asking him to reconsider,
but the dispatch had been lost in transit.
From the start Macquarie and Bigge were
at odds. Bigge was an aristocrat who judged
everything by English standards. He viewed
Macquarie, a soldier, as being of a lower
class. Bigge preferred the company of John
Macarthur, a sworn enemy of Macquarie.
Bigge’s arrogance led him to conduct the
inquiry in an unethical and unprofessional
manner. Many witnesses were openly
encouraged to complain about the Governor
and his policies.
Macquarie, for his part, was accustomed
to being obeyed unquestioningly. He had
great difficulty coping with Bigge’s authority,
which derived directly from the Colonial
Secretary and could not be controlled from
Government House.
Other 
notable events
Governor Macquarie
opened Francis
Greenway’s Hyde Park
Barracks on 
4 June
.
Campbell’s Bank — the
colony’s first savings
bank, established by
Barron Field and Robert
Campbell — opened for
business on 
17 July
.
1820
AS HIS relationship with Governor Macquarie
rapidly worsened, J T Bigge pursued his
investigation into conditions in New South
Wales enthusiastically. He failed to follow
basic rules of law in taking evidence from
witnesses. Much of his information was from
statements taken in private with witnesses
not being subject to cross-examination.
Bigge provided all of Macquarie’s enemies
with an opening to take revenge on the
Governor. Anyone who had ever been refused
a land grant or a permit for some form of
business saw the Royal Commission as their
chance to malign him.
In particular the exclusives — free settlers
and former military officers — had the chance
to criticise the policy of giving emancipists
equal social status. Macquarie was seen as
undermining the social status of the exclusives,
for which they would never forgive him.
BY THIS time Macquarie’s health was
deteriorating quickly. Ten years of coping
with the competing factions in the colony
had drained him physically and mentally.
To cap this off, Bigge’s presence was causing
disarray that would take years to stabilise.
Dispirited, Macquarie again wrote to
Lord Bathurst on 
29 February
asking that
he be relieved from his duties. The reply
granting his wish was dispatched from
London on 
15 July
.
Other 
notable events
John Joseph Therry
and Philip Conolly, the
first authorised Catholic
priests in New South
Wales, were appointed
on 
3 May
.
On 
15 August
Macquarie issued an
order that all carriages
and horse traffic drive
on the left-hand side
of the colony’s roads.
For the first time, on
25 November
grazing
was permitted beyond
the Cumberland Plains.
Rapidly developing into a
prosperous settlement,
Sydney after a decade of
Macquarie’s governorship
Bigge’s inquiry
Macquarie resigns
background image
reoffenders — those convicts who had
committed crimes after arriving in New
South Wales.
Allman was a fierce disciplinarian who
created the type of fearful settlement that
appealed to the Colonial Office in London.
Convicts were set to work on hard labouring
jobs, mainly cutting and milling timber to be
sent to Sydney for building projects. Others
were put to work growing sugar cane.
LORD BATHURST, the Colonial Secretary
in London, was desperate to end the
controversy of the Macquarie years. Nothing
would have pleased him more than  to stop
the flood of complaints from the exclusives
in Sydney who hated the status the Governor
had given to emancipists.
On 
3 February
he chose Major General
Thomas Brisbane, a protégé of the Duke of
Wellington (the Battle of Waterloo hero).
An uncontroversial appointment, Brisbane
was best known for his astronomy studies.
Bathurst felt reasonably sure that
Brisbane could be relied upon to implement
the reforms he expected to be recommended
in the forthcoming Bigge reports. Brisbane
arrived at Port Jackson on 
7 November
and
was sworn in as Governor on 
1 December
.
HAVING CREATED mayhem and divided
the colony in a way it had not seen for many
years, J T Bigge sailed for England on
14 February
. Much of the good work
Macquarie had done to establish a fairer
society had been undone, and the colony was
again descending into the sort of conflict
that had caused the Rum Rebellion in 1808.
Bigge’s presence had added greatly to
Governor Macquarie’s poor health and
spurred his wish to retire.
On reaching England, Bigge went to
work preparing his report, wading through
thousands of pages of testimonies. He would
report to the Parliament the following year.
ACTING UNDER Governor Macquarie’s
orders, on 
17 March
Captain Francis Allman
sailed from Sydney with a party of convicts
and guards to establish a new settlement at
Port Macquarie, at the mouth of the Hastings
River. This was to be a place to send
Other 
notable events
A meeting of
emancipists on
23 January
launched a
petition to the King
requesting that they
be legally placed on
the same level as the
exclusives. It was
carried to England on
25 October
by
emancipist attorneys
William Redfern and
Edward Eagar.
Frederick Goulburn
became the first
Colonial Secretary of
New South Wales on
1 February
.
On 
29 October
Governor
Macquarie laid the
foundation stone for
St Mary’s Chapel, the
first Catholic church in
New South Wales.
Port Macquarie
1821
16
Lord Bathurst, who was
to be Secretary of State
for the Colonies for an
extraordinary 15 years
The new Governor
Bigge departs
To Port Macquarie
background image
Living conditions were harsh, with bitter
westerly winds blowing in off the Southern
Ocean. Convicts worked on shipbuilding
projects and suffered brutal punishment for
even the most minor offence.
EXHAUSTED BY more than a decade
governing New South Wales, Lachlan
Macquarie and his wife Elizabeth left Sydney
Town on 
15 February
. Huge crowds gathered
on the shore to farewell them. Most were
grateful for the stability and prosperity he
had brought them. Others, mostly the
exclusives led by people such as John
Macarthur, celebrated his departure.
IN 
FEBRUARY
the new Female Factory
opened at Parramatta, on land previously
part of the Governor’s Domain. Female
convicts were usually assigned to domestic
service in the homes of military officers,
civilian administrators or free settlers. Those
who were not were accommodated in the
Female Factory, which was designed by
Francis Greenway for 300 inmates.
Women assigned to the factory worked
making goods to be sold in the government
stores. It also functioned as a sort of marriage
bureau and employment office — men looking
for wives called at the Female Factory to
ON VAN Diemen’s Land’s rugged western
coast a penal settlement was established at
Sarah Island in Macquarie Harbour on
2 January
. Created by Lieutenant-Governor,
William Sorrel, it would be a place to send
the worst of the island’s convicts — those
who rebelled against discipline or reoffended
after arriving from England.
The Female Factory
Macquarie Harbour
1822
view the candidates, as did householders
seeking domestic servants.
The Female Factory 
at Parramatta
Macquarie departs
17
The Sarah Island penal
settlement at Macquarie
Harbour on the rugged
western coast of Van
Diemen’s Land
background image
After arriving at Deptford,
England on 
5 July
, Macquarie
reported to Colonial Secretary
Lord Bathurst. It was a
difficult meeting with the
Bigge reports being presented,
creating friction between
Bathurst and the former
Governor. Subseqently,
Macquarie was presented to
King George IV.
In 
August
the Macquaries
returned to his traditional
home on the Isle of Mull in
Scotland. As Elizabeth’s
health deteriorated, two
months later they departed
on a grand European tour to
restore her. This turned out
to be a tactical mistake, as it
would allow supporters of
the Bigge reports to mount a
case against Macquarie
without his being there to
present a counter-argument.
WITH HIS great patron,
Governor Macquarie, now
departed, Francis Greenway’s influence in
the colony declined. Greenway’s behaviour
became more and more outrageous. He was
confirmed as Civil Architect by Governor
Brisbane, with a number of restrictions.
He opted to resign on 
15 November
, but
refused to vacate the residence the government
had provided for him. Greenway resisted
every legal measure to evict him, finally
producing a document that showed he had
been given the cottage in perpetuity. This
was clater claimed to have been a forgery.
THE ROYAL Commissioner, John Thomas
Bigge, produced three reports on his
inquiries into conditions in New South
Wales. The first, called 
The State of the Colony
of New South Wales, was tabled in the House
of Commons on
19 June
.
It was an unbalanced commentary by a
man who had not properly understood the
situation. He had made no effort to grasp
the unique conditions in the colony and so
they were not reflected in the report.
Macquarie was criticised for mismanaging
convict resources, for pursuing a wasteful
public building program, and for his policy
towards emancipists. Little credit was given
for the way Macquarie had stabilised the
colony after the disastrous Rum Rebellion
when it had come close to anarchy. The
second and third reports were tabled the
following year.
THOSE WHO favoured humane treatment
of emancipists clashed with the wealthy
and powerful exclusives in the case of
servant girl Ann Rumsby, who was assigned
to the household of Dr Henry Douglass,
Superintendent of the Female Factory and a
magistrate. In 
August
a naval surgeon, James
Hall, claimed before magistrate Reverend
William Marsden that Rumsby alleged
Douglass had made improper advances to
her. Douglass was pro-emanicipist; Marsden
was pro-exclusive. 
When he found out about this, Douglass
arranged for Rumsby to see Governor
Brisbane to tell her story. However, before
that could happen, Marsden had her brought
before the bench of magistrates on 
19 August
.
When she repeatedly claimed that Douglass
was innocent, after a five-hour cross-
examination Marsden and his colleagues
found her guilty of perjury. For this she was
to be sent to Port Macquarie for the rest of
her sentence.
Brisbane went to her rescue, saving
Rumsby from Port Macquarie. He removed
Marsden and the others from the magistrates
bench on 
23 August
, and Douglass was
completely cleared of the charges of
impropriety. It was an example of how far
the exclusives were prepared to go to
remove pro-emancipists like Douglass from
positions of power in the colony.
St Matthew’s Church at
Windsor, north-west of
Sydney, is considered to
be one of Greenway’s
greatest masterpieces
18
Greenway’s
demise
Bigge’s first report
The Ann Rumsby case
As well as a soldier,
Governor Thomas
Brisbane was a well-
respected astronomer
background image
Allan Cunningham
1823
Other 
notable events
Distilling of spirits
became legal on
1 January
.
On 
24 February
Lieutenant Percy
Simpson established
an agricultural depot
in the Wellington Valley.
Troops of the 3rd
Regiment (Buffs) arrived
on 
29 August
to replace
the 48th Regiment.
summary of the development of agriculture
in the colony.
Following his demolition of Macquarie’s
reputation, Bigge was rewarded with another
inquiry, this time into the situation in the
Cape Colony [South Africa], Mauritius and
Ceylon [Sri Lanka]. Macquarie wrote a long
report answering the claims made by Bigge,
but Lord Bathurst refused him permission
to publish it.
IN 
MARCH
Allan Cunningham travelled
west to Bathurst to begin an exploration
aimed at finding a direct route to the
Liverpool Plains discovered by John Oxley.
Leaving Bathurst on 
15 April
, he journeyed
to the Liverpool Ranges, which appeared
impassable. Ill health among his party forced
a return to the Goulburn River.
Striking north once again, on 
2 June
Cunningham saw what he believed was a
pass through the mountains. He was unable
to explore futher and returned to Bathurst.
ON 
19 JULY
the British parliament passed
the 
New South Wales Judicature Act 1823, which
replaced the original 
New South Wales Courts
Act 1787. Much of the content of the Act, also
known as the Third Charter of Justice, came
from recommendations made by J T Bigge.
The Governor’s power was to be tempered
by an appointed Legislative Council that
would advise him on administration of the
colony. While the Council could overrule a
ON 
21 FEBRUARY
Bigge delivered his
second report, 
The Judicial Establishments of
New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land, to the
House of Commons. Most of his destructive
criticisms of the colonial legal system were
not included in the report, but delivered
privately to Colonial Secretary Lord Bathurst.
Much of the report and the unpublished
private comments were directed towards
discrediting Macquarie by claiming he had
overstepped the legal limits of his position.
Bigge failed to acknowledge that, when
Macquarie had taken control of the colony,
the rule of law had all but collapsed, largely
due to the activities of exclusives such as
John Macarthur with whom Bigge had
become so friendly.
His third and least contentious report,
The State of Agriculture and Trade in the Colony of
New South Wales, was delivered on 
13 March
.
Although Bigge could not resist the
temptation for another snipe at Macquarie,
this report did contain a fairly accurate
19
Bigge’s final reports
On to Pandora’s Pass
Third Charter of Justice
background image
ON 
23 OCTOBER
John Oxley sailed north
to explore the eastern coastline as far as
Port Curtis. While returning he entered
Moreton Bay on 
29 November
. There he
found four shipwrecked escaped convicts
living with local indigenous people.
Their leader, Thomas Pamphlett, told of
a major river emptying into the south-
western side of the bay. Oxley navigated a
considerable distance up the broad
waterway which he named Brisbane, in
honour of the Governor, on 
2 December
.
Other 
notable events
Francis Greenway’s
St James’ Church was
consecrated by
Reverend Samuel
Marsden on
11 February
.
Bank of Van Diemen’s
Land opened for
business on 
15 March
.
On 
14 May
Colonel
George Arthur took over
as Lieutenant-Governor
of Van Diemen’s Land.
Captain J G Bremer in
HMS Tamar set up Fort
Dundas on Melville
Island off the north
coast on 
30 September
.
On 
14 October
William
Wentworth and Robert
Wardell began
publishing their
Australian newspaper.
Oxley sails north
Justice of the Supreme Court of New South
Wales and Saxe Bannister appointed
Attorney General.
A new Criminal Court was established
on 
10 June
, and the Quarter Sessions court
began operating on 
14 October
. Trial by
jury was introduced for cases in which the
penalty was not capital punishment.
A new and separate Supreme Court was
also created for Van Diemen’s Land on
10 May
. Sir John Pedder became Chief
Justice and Joseph Gellibrand Attorney
General. These changes were made to prepare
for the impending separation of Van Diemen’s
Land from New South Wales.
The 
New South Wales Act 1823 made New
South Wales a Crown Colony on 
11 August
,
upgrading it from the former status of Penal
Colony. This was considered a first step
towards responsible government. The new
Legislative Council, comprising the Governor
and five appointed members, first met on
25 August
.
AS THE Australian agricultural industry
grew it was inevitable that big business
would become involved. On 
1 November
Britain’s parliament passed legislation
bringing the Australian Agricultural
Company into existence. Its major investors
were British politicians and Bank of
England officers.
The Company’s primary concern was
expansion of the wool industry, with a
secondary interest in coal-mining in the
Hunter River region. Governor Brisbane
was directed by the Colonial Office to make
land grants to it of up to 400 000 hectares.
t
DURING 
MAY
the colony’s Third Charter
of Justice came into being, based on legislation
passed the previous year. It was proclaimed
on 
17 May
, with Francis Forbes as Chief
1824
governor on legislation, the Governor usually
won the day as members were mostly
appointed by the Governor. The Supreme
Court had to certify that legislation passed
by the Council was in accordance with the
law. The Colonial Office retained a power of
ultimate veto.
Van Diemen’s Land would be a separate
penal colony, although it would still be
administered from Sydney. The Supreme
Court would be split, with separate courts
for New South Wales and Van Diemen’s
Land. The New South Wales court was
constituted on 
13 October
with Francis
Forbes as Chief Justice.
20
Greenway’s St James’ Church
in central Sydney
Big business
Justice and government
background image
EXPERIENCED EXPLORER Hamilton
Hume and surveyor William Hovell set out
from Hume’s Gunning property on
17 October
with six convict servants to
trek to Westernport on the southern coast.
Their intention was to open up new
areas of settlement in the district; however,
the government was unenthusiastic. There
was little in the way of financial or
logistical support for the venture.
They headed south-west, crossing the
Murrumbidgee, then the waterway that
Hovell called the Hume River. This would
later be renamed the Murray.
After crossing numerous rivers in what
is now northern Victoria, on 
16 December
they reached the coast. They thought they
were at Westernport; in reality it was Corio
Bay, on the western side of what later
became known as Port Phillip Bay.
On returning to Sydney, they advised
Governor Brisbane that the region they
called Westernport was ideal for agriculture.
This mistake would create much confusion
and waste of money and resources in the
future. Neither Hume nor Hovell ever
accepted responsibility for the mistake.
Having had extensive experience in
regions where malaria was rife, he became
concerned that the mosquito-infested
Humpybong was similarly affected. In
November
, when Governor Brisbane inspected
the settlement, he accepted Miller’s
suggestion that it be moved up the Brisbane
River to where the city centre is today.
Humpybong was the
original Moreton Bay
settlement established
by Lieutenant Henry Miller
The Hume and Hovell
party cross the Hume
River, later renamed the
Murray by Charles Sturt
GOVERNOR BRISBANE ended the system
of giving land away for free on 
24 July
. As
recommended by J T Bigge, it would now
be sold on the basis of five shillings [about
$40] per acre [0.4 hectare], payable over
three years.
The funds generated would be used to
finance increased immigration to the colony.
This change also made it much easier to
place a value on existing land grants. Those
who had received free land in past decades
could now offer their properties for sale
with a good idea of what they were worth.
NOT LONG after John Oxley explored the
region, it was decided to create a new
settlement at Moreton Bay. The site chosen
was Humpybong on what is now the
Redcliffe peninsula. Lieutenant Henry
Miller landed on 
10 September
with a
party of convicts; however, he was unhappy
with the site from the beginning.
21
Moreton Bay beginnings
Hume and Hovell
Selling land
William Hovell
Hamilton Hume
background image
FOLLOWING HIS inspection of the region
the previous year, on 
28 February
Governor
Brisbane gave the go-ahead for a penal
settlement at Moreton Bay. He accepted
Lieutenant Miller’s advice that Humpybong
was not the ideal location and agreed to
settling on the banks of the Brisbane River,
where the city centre is today. The move
was completed by 
June
.
Moreton Bay was created mainly for
secondary offenders — those convicts who
had committed further crimes after arriving
in the colony. Before long it gained a
reputation as a place of brutal punishment.
IN ACCORDANCE with the suggestion of
J T Bigge, Van Diemen’s Land was separated
from New South Wales by a British
Order in Council on 
14 June
,
which officially took effect on
3 December
.
The new Penal Colony of Van
Diemen’s Land was to be under the
control of a Lieutenant-Governor
with appointed Legislative and
Executive Councils to advise him.
The Governor in Sydney would
continue to exercise overall
administration.
FOLLOWING A barrage of negative
comment from the exclusives to
their contacts in London, the
Secretary of State for the Colonies
1825
Other 
notable events
The Norfolk Island
penal settlement was
reopened on 
6 June
as
a place to send the
worst convicts.
On 
21 October
William C Wentworth
called for responsible
government for New
South Wales.
Darling arrives
Moreton Bay settled
Van Diemen’s Land
advised Governor Brisbane that he was to
be recalled.
Brisbane’s position was seriously
compromised when it was revealed the New
South Wales Colonial Secretary, Frederick
Goulburn, had regularly withheld information
from the Governor and corresponded
directly with Lord Bathurst.
Brisbane’s term ended on
1 December
. His replacement,
Lieutenant General Ralph Darling,
was a very different character —
one who demanded total obedience
and showed little mercy to those
who upset him. He was officially
appointed on 
16 July
, with separate
governorships of New South Wales
and Van Diemen’s Land.
Darling arrived at Hobart Town
on 
24 November
, where he made
the official proclamation separating
the two colonies on 
3 December
.
He then sailed for Sydney Town,
arriving on 
17 December
, and was
sworn in as Governor two days later.
22
Governor Ralph Darling
background image
It was done to discourage, or at least
slow down, the constant expansion of
settlers into virtually unknown territory.
Although the entire colony was considered
Crown land, none of it had been surveyed
and no legal title to it could be granted.
Also, it was impossible for police or other
authorities to maintain any control or
provide protection beyond the limits.
ON 
8 NOVEMBER
Army privates Joseph
Sudds and Patrick Thompson of the 57th
Regiment staged a robbery with the intention
of being charged and convicted. They
believed that life for convicts in the colony
was better than for soldiers.
Governor Darling, outraged at this collapse
of discipline and concerned that such actions
could spread to other soldiers wanting to
secure their discharge from the Army, reacted
furiously. When the court sentenced the
pair to seven years transportation, Darling
intervened and changed the penalty to
seven years hard labour in chain gangs.
On 
22 November
they were drummed
out of the Army.
A public outcry ensued, but Darling
was unmoved despite being told by
his Legislative Council that he had no
power to alter sentences passed by
the courts. He ignored the advice until
a dispatch from the Colonial Office
ordered the soldiers’ release. By this
time Sudds had already died in jail on
27 November
. The Sudds–Thompson
case would hang over Darling for the
rest of his life, especially after his
return to England.
THE ALREADY considerable power of the
Church of England in New South Wales
was greatly enhanced on 
9 March
with the
issuing in London of letters patent to form
the Church and Schools Corporation.
This gave the church increased status by
designating it the established religion. Other
Christian demoninations wanting to set up
in the colony would need special authorisation
by the Colonial Office in London. With the
new status came large grants of land and
control of the colony’s education system.
GOVERNOR DARLING proclaimed the
official Limits of Settlement for New South
Wales on 
5 September
. Beyond these limits
no one was permitted to establish a
permanent settlement.
1826
Other 
notable events
Alexander Macleay
became New South
Wales Colonial
Secretary on 
3 January
.
In 
March
Lieutenant
Patrick Logan took
over as commandant
at Moreton Bay.
An insurrection on
Norfolk Island was
savagely suppressed
on 
25 September
.
The Van Diemen’s
Land Company landed
its first settlers and
livestock at Circular
Head on 
27 October
.
An influenza epidemic
swept Sydney in
November
, killing 37
people in two days.
Based on Hume and
Hovell’s incorrect
reports, a settlement
was established at
Westernport, Victoria,
on 
12 December
.
23
A melodramatic illustration of the plight
of Privates Sudds and Thompson
Lieutenant Patrick Logan,
the commandant at
Moreton Bay who took
brutality against convicts
to new levels
Church schools
Limits of location
Sudds and Thompson
background image
When Chief Justice Francis Forbes refused
to certify the legislation, Darling jailed
Edward Hall, publisher of the 
Monitor. The
editor of the 
Australian was heavily fined.
Darling amended his legislation to include
banishment from the colony for anyone
twice convicted of such offences. In the end,
when a more liberal government was elected
in Britain, Darling was forced to end his
attempts at censorship.
ON 
30 APRIL
explorer Allan Cunningham
set out from the upper Hunter River region
on his longest expedition. After trekking
north to the Liverpool Plains and crossing
the Namoi, Gwydir and Dumaresq rivers, he
turned north-east.
His party then traversed the New England
Tableland and reached the Condamine River
by 
5 June
. Pushing on to the top of a steep
escarpment, he could see the Moreton Bay
settlement on the Brisbane River.
As a result of this expedition, large areas
of rich grazing and agricultural country were
opened up to settlement. The region from
the New England Tableland to the Darling
Downs was particularly fertile.
GOVERNOR DARLING hated criticism.
He had been greatly embarrassed by the
Sudds–Thompson case, much of which was
made public by the 
Australian and Monitor
newspapers. Both conducted constant anti-
Darling campaigns, driving the Governor
into a frenzy.
After a particularly virulent attack by the
Monitor on 
16 March
, Darling began moves to
censor the press. Supported by Lord Bathurst
and the Colonial Office, he passed legislation
imposing a stamp duty of fourpence for each
copy of a newspaper sold and requiring all
newspapers to be licensed.
Other 
notable events
William C Wentworth
staged a meeting on
26 January
to call for
trial by jury, no taxation
without representation,
a legislative assembly,
and manhood suffrage.
Captain James Stirling
explored the Swan
River region in the
west on 
5 March
with
a view to establishing
a settlement.
Commandant Patrick
Logan discovered coal
at Limestone [Ipswich]
in the Moreton Bay
settlement on 
8 June
.
Chief Justice 
Francis Forbes
1827
24
Darling the censor
Cunningham to the gap
background image
AS THE colony developed, a reliable postal
communications system became essential.
On 
1 March
post offices were established at
Parramatta, Campbelltown, Liverpool,
Penrith, Windsor, Bathurst and Newcastle.
These settlements received a twice-weekly
mail service, provided by a man on horseback.
Newcastle, Port Macquarie and Hobart Town
were linked with Sydney by regular mail
services carried by ship.
WHEN THE British parliament passed the
Judicature Act 1828 on 
25 July
, membership of
the New South Wales Legislative Council
increased to 15. In addition to the Governor,
seven members were officials, seven were
non-officials. A majority of members could
overrule the Governor on legislative matters.
1828
The Act also made a number of changes
to the colonial court system. Civilian juries
were now allowed for civil trials. The
accused in a criminal case was given a choice
of jury between seven military officers and
twelve civilians. All provisions applied to
both free settlers and emancipists.
THE BANK of Australia in Sydney was
broken into on 
14 September
by thieves
who excavated a tunnel from a stormwater
drain in the street. They escaped with more
than £20 000 [more than $3 million]. The
bank never recovered from the loss and
eventually closed its doors.
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR George Arthur
all but went to war on the indigenous
people of Van Diemen’s Land. On 
15 April
he issued a proclamation banning them
from entering any of the settled areas of the
colony. Then, on 
1 November
, he declared
martial law. Roving bands of Europeans
were encouraged to hunt down and kill any
Aborigines they found.
Other 
notable events
The ship Morley arrived
at Port Jackson on
3 March
, bringing
whooping cough to the
colony. Governor
Darling’s son was
among the many who
died as a result.
Allan Cunningham
forged a path from
Brisbane to the Darling
Downs on 
25 August
through the gap in the
range that now carries
his name.
On 
10 November
Charles Sturt and
Hamilton Hume left
Sydney to survey the
Macquarie River.
25
A typical settler’s cottage
Changes in government
Robbing banks
Indigenous relations
Post offices
George Arthur,
Lieutenant-Governor of
Van Diemen’s Land
In 1817
The New York Stock
Exchange was established
on 
8 March
.
The Ambonese people
rebelled against Dutch rule
on 
15 May
.
In 1818
Chile gained independence
from Spain on 
12 February
.
Carl III was crowned King
of Norway on 
7 September
.
The 49th parallel was
declared the designated
border between Canada
and the USA on 
15 June
.
In 1819
Stamford Raffles established
a trading post at Singapore
on 
6 February
.
Spain ceded Florida to the
USA on 
22 February
.
Eleven people were killed in
a cavalry charge in Britain
on 
16 August
.
In 1820
George IV became King of
Great Britain on 
29 January
.
Mormon founder Joseph
Smith claims his first vision.
In 1821
Emperor Napoleon died in
exile on St Helena island on
5 May
.
On 
28 July
Peru declared
its independence from Spain.
Following the Mexican War
of Independence, the country
became independent of
Spain on 
27 September
.
Panama and the Dominican
Republic gained
independence from Spain.
In 1822
On 
3 July
Charles Babbage
published his proposal for
the ‘difference engine’, the
pioneer computer.
The first group of freed
American slaves arrived in
Liberia in western Africa
and founded the town of
Monrovia, named for
US President Monroe.
In 1823
On 20 February James
Weddell’s expedition
reached further south in
Antarctica than any
previous explorer.
In 
July
the Peel government
in Britain abolished the
death penalty for more
than 100 offences.
The first Burmese War
against British colonisers was
launched on 
23 September
.
In 1824
The Ashanti defeated British
forces in the Gold Coast on
22 January
.
Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony
was first performed in
Vienna on 
7 May
.
In 1825
The Stockton and Darlington
Railway began operating in
Britain on 
27 September
.
The Erie Canal, from Albany
to Buffalo in the USA,
opened on 
26 October
.
Nicholas I became Tsar of
Russia on 
1 December
.
In 1826
Former US Presidents
Thomas Jefferson and John
Adams died on the same
day — 
4 July
, 50 years
after the Declaration of
Independence.
The British colonies of
Penang, Malacca and
Singapore were grouped as
the Straits Settlements.
In 1827
Edward Gibbon Wakefield
abducted Ellen Turner, a
wealthy heiress, on 
7 March
.
The Brazilian navy defeated
the Argentine navy in a
major sea battle on 
8 April
.
In 1828
The Duke of Wellington
became Prime Minister of
Britain on 
22 January
.
Renowned military leader
Andrew Jackson was
elected US President on
3 December
.
More than 10 000 Japanese
died in a typhoon on the
island of Kyushu.
In 1829
In the Greek War of
Independence, Greece
gained effective autonomy
from the Ottoman Empire
on 
22 March
.
Many restrictions on
Catholics in Britain and
Ireland were removed by
passage of the Catholic
Relief Act on 
13 April
.
Robert Peel established the
London Metropolitan Police
on 
19 June
.
William Burt took out a
patent for a form of
typewriter in the USA on
23 July
.
The last Bounty mutineer
remaining on Pitcairn
Island died.
In 1830
On 26 June William IV
became King of Great Britain.
The independence of
Belgium from the
Netherlands was recognised
on 
20 December
.
In 1831
William Lloyd Garrison first
published the anti-slavery
newspaper Liberator on
1 January
in Boston.
The power of the Ottoman
Empire was challenged on
29 March
by the Great
Bosnian Uprising.
Russian troops crushed
Polish resistance on
8 September
in the Battle
of Warsaw.
Charles Darwin departed
England in HMS Beagle on
27 December
on his
historic scientific voyage.
In 1832
A cholera outbreak in London
on 
12 February
eventually
claimed 3000 lives.
On 
7 May
the Treaty of
London created the modern
Kingdom of Greece, with a
Bavarian prince as monarch.
Britain’s parliament passed
the Reform Act on 
7 June
,
making major changes to
the electoral system.
In 1833
On 
1 August
the British
parliament passed the
Slavery Abolition Act, which
banned slave trading
anywhere in the Empire.
Child labour in Britain was
limited under the Factory
Act, passed on 
29 August
.
In 1834
In Spain a royal decree
abolished the oppressive
Spanish Inquisition of the
Catholic Church.
Britain’s Slavery Abolition
Act became law on
1 August
, freeing all slaves
in British territories.
The Palace of Westminster
(Houses of Parliament) in
London were destroyed by
fire on 
16 October
.
Around the world
26
background image
1829
AFTER SOME intense lobbying in London,
Captain James Stirling gained the necessary
legislative support from the British
government to establish a new colony in the
western part of the continent.
On 
18 June
he arrived at the Swan River,
the site of Perth, in the storeship 
Parmelia and
proclaimed the new colony with himself as
Lieutenant-Governor. Stirling was determined
that Swan River would be only for free settlers,
that no convicts would be sent there.
BY THIS time settlement of New South
Wales had extended well beyond the
original five counties laid out in Governor
THROUGH THE heat of a severe summer
drought Charles Sturt continued his
explorations, begun the previous year, of the
Bogan River and Macquarie Marshes. On
2 February
he and Hamilton Hume arrived
at what he called a ‘noble river’ that he
named after Governor Darling. After seven
days they retraced their steps and explored
the Castlereagh River for 160 kilometres
downstream to its junction with the Darling.
After returning to Sydney and regaining
his health, Sturt proposed to the Governor
that he explore the Darling River to see
whether it emptied into an inland sea. Darling
refused, instead instructing him to investigate
the Murrumbidgee and Lachlan rivers.
Departing Sydney on 
3 November
, Sturt
travelled to Gundagai. From there the
expedition moved west along the
Murrumbidgee to its junction with the
Lachlan by 
25 December
.
27
Helen Dance, wife of the Captain of the
ship 
Sulphur, cuts down a tree on
18 August to mark the founding of Perth
James Stirling
Charles Sturt
The Darling River as it was
when Sturt first saw it
Sturt explores
Settling the west
Nineteen counties
background image
Brisbane’s time. Anyone living beyond the
boundaries of the five counties was, in effect,
outside the protection of the law. As well,
for settlers to have legal title to their land it
had to be surveyed, and the surveyors were
working well behind the rate of settlement.
With the agreement of the Sectretary of
State for the Colonies, Lord Bathurst,
Governor Darling expanded the counties to
nineteen, stretching from Gloucester in the
north to Braidwood in the south and Orange
in the west. Their boundaries were established
by Colonial Surveyor Thomas Mitchell, and
proclaimed by Darling on 
17 October
.
EDWARD GIBBON Wakefield had several
times married young heiresses without their
families’ consent. He was sentenced to three
years in London’s Newgate Gaol for abduction.
While there he began developing theories
for orderly and properly funded colonisation.
Wakefield
In 
June
he published 
A Sketch of a Proposal for
Colonizing Australia, despite never having
been there and having limited knowledge of
the colonies.
He proposed that Crown land be sold at
a price affordable to those with sufficient
capital, but too expensive for the average
labourer. Through hard work and thrift a
labourer would eventually be able to afford
his own land.
Money raised by land sales would be
used to provide assisted passages to the
colony for tradesmen and labourers and
their families. This would, he hoped, ensure
such colonies were settled by the best of all
the British classes without the need for
convict transportation.
Other 
notable events
On 
31 March
Fort
Dundas on Melville
Island was abandoned
and the settlers moved
to Raffles Bay on the
northern mainland.
This site closed on
31 August
and most of
the settlers went to
Swan River.
Captain Charles
Fremantle arrived at
Swan River in
HMS Challenger on
2 May
. He formally
took possession of all
the remaining portion
of the continent that
was not already British.
28
Edward Gibbon Wakefield
background image
the island. On 
2 October
he organised what
was called the ‘black line’. More than 5000
police and settlers fanned out across the
island in an attempt to drive the Aborigines
into captivity on the Tasman Peninsula. By
26 November
just two Aborigines had been
captured and two shot dead.
IN VAN Diemen’s Land it was decided to
gradually close the Macquarie Harbour
settlement. Convicts would be moved to a
new establishment called Port Arthur,
which was relatively close to Hobart and
easy to supply. The site was on a peninsula
accessible only by boat or along a narrow
stretch of land called Eaglehawk Neck.
Established in 
September
, Port Arthur
eventually became the most well-known
and most notorious of all the Australian
penal settlements.
1830
Other 
notable events
Port Macquarie was
opened to free settlers
on 
13 July
. Most
convicts were removed
to Moreton Bay or
Norfolk island.
Moreton Bay
commandant Patrick
Logan was killed,
apparently by
Aborigines, on
17 October
while
exploring the region.
A British Order in
Council established
Western Australia as a
Crown Colony on
1 November
. Authority
was given to create a
Legislative Council to
advise the Governor.
ON 
7 JANUARY
Charles Sturt continued
his journey down the Murrumbidgee River.
Seven days later his whaleboat emerged onto
a broad river which he named after Colonial
Secretary Sir George Murray. He was unaware
that it was the same stream Hume and
Hovell had called the Hume River in 1824.
Over the next nine days there were several
hostile encounters with indigenous peoples
along the river, before another major river
junction was reached. A short exploration
of this other stream convinced Sturt it was
the Darling.
The expedition continued down the
Murray, reaching its mouth at Lake
Alexandrina on 
9 February
. Sturt was
disappointed that he could find no way to
take the boat from the lake into Encounter
Bay and the open sea. His frustration was
compounded when the ship that Darling had
promised would meet them failed to arrive.
On 
13 February
the party began retracing
their steps, rowing upstream against the
current. Already exhausted, they found the
going incredibly difficult. Finally, on 
23 March
,
they reached the depot Sturt had left on the
Murrumbidgee, but it was deserted.
After rowing until 
11 April
, Sturt set up
a base onshore and sent two of the stronger
members of the party overland for help. They
returned a week later and the whole party
made it back to Sydney by 
25 May
.
GEORGE ARTHUR, Lieutenant-Governor
of Van Diemen’s Land, continued his war of
attrition against the indigenous peoples of
29
Sturt’s party is challenged by
indigenous warriors on the Murray
Port Arthur
Indigenous wars
Sturt down the Murray
background image
GOVERNOR RALPH Darling was officially
recalled to England on 
15 March
. With a
more liberal government in office in England,
his attitudes and style were out of favour.
Although fairly competent as an administrator,
he was much too rigid in his approach to
discipline and had a bad habit of trying to
crush anyone who criticised him.
He and his family departed Sydney on
22 October
in the transport ship 
Hooghly. In
some quarters the relief was obvious.
William C Wentworth held a large party at
his home, Vaucluse House, to celebrate as the
Governor’s ship sailed out of the harbour.
Darling’s replacement arrived on
2 December
and was sworn in the following
day. Although he was also a soldier, Major
General Richard Bourke was to be a very
different Governor. He represented the
radical changes sweeping Britain as the Whig
(liberal) party took over following decades
of Tory (conservative) rule.
1831
Other 
notable events
On 
28 April
James
Stirling officially
became Governor and
Commander-in-Chief of
Western Australia.
The Australian
Agricultural Company
took over the mining
of coal in the Hunter
region from the
government in 
October
.
Colonial Surveyor
Thomas Mitchell
departed Sydney on
24 November
to
explore the Castlereagh
and Gwydir regions of
New South Wales.
The First Earl of Ripon, as
Secretary of State for the
Colonies, gave his name
to the Ripon Regulations
VISCOUNT GODERICH, the First Earl of
Ripon, became Secretary of State for the
Colonies in the government of Earl Grey at
the end of 1830. Under his instructions, on
1 August
all free land grants in New South
Wales and Van Diemen’s Land ceased. The
new land sales regime became known as the
Ripon Regulations.
From this time on land was allocated by
public auction with a minimum price of five
shillings per acre [0.4 hectare]. This change
was largely made possible by the intensive
program of land surveys conducted over the
previous decade, which had cleared much of
the backlog.
30
The new Governor, Richard Bourke
Darling departs
Ripon Regulations
background image
auctioned for a fixed minimum price per
acre. On 
7 February
the new Legislative and
Executive Councils met for the first time.
ALL THE colonies suffered a chronic
gender imbalance from the very beginning:
there were far more men than women. In an
attempt to overcome this the New South
Wales Legislative Council voted £3600
[about $600 000] to pay for assisted
passages for females.
Immigration agents in Britain and Ireland
began seeking out suitable marriageable
young women to bring to the colony. On
10 August
the ship 
Red Rover arrived at Port
Jackson with 202 female immigrants, mostly
orphans from Irish charitable institutions.
No special preparation was made for
their arrival and no accommodation set
aside. Most were cared for by charity
groups until they found employment. Those
who did not were often forced into
prostitution to feed themselves.
Other 
notable events
The Savings Bank of
New South Wales was
established on
18 August
by an Act of
the British parliament.
It took over the
operations of the
privately owned
Campbell’s Bank.
1832
THREE YEARS after it was established, the
future of the Western Australian colony at
Swan River was not looking bright. Many of
the initial immigrants found the land so
difficult to work that they gave up and
returned to Britain or went to New South
Wales or Van Diemen’s Land.
Reports of their experiences soon reached
Britain, discouraging many prospective
immigrants. In an attempt to rescue the
situation, on 
12 August
Governor James
Stirling left for England to outline the
problems to the British government and
seek assistance.
On the legal side, the Ripon Regulations
introduced in the eastern colonies the previous
year were proclaimed for Western Australia
in 
January
. Henceforth, all land was to be
31
This idyllic illustration of
the Swan River was far
from the truth. In reality
the landscape caused
immigrants many
problems, forcing many
to give up and leave.
Slow times in the west
Gender imbalance
background image
WHILE THE isolation of Macquarie Harbour
in Van Diemen’s Land discouraged escapes
by convicts, it did not prevent them. The
rugged landscape, however, did make it
almost impossible to produce food. Everything
had to be brought in by ship. This caused
regular shortages leading to malnutrition
and scurvy among prisoners. The settlement
on Sarah Island was too expensive in terms
of lives lost and cost of maintaining.
In 
November
the station was closed
down and all convicts moved to Port
Arthur, only a short distance from Hobart
by boat. Along with the convicts Macquarie
Harbour’s brutal reputation was also
imported to Port Arthur.
AS PART of the changes brought by
Governor Bourke, the Church of England
lost its previous privileged status. On
4 February
an Order in Council of the
British government abolished the Church
and Schools Corporation, which had
conferred preferred status on the Church of
England as well as making it the sole
education provider.
Now the Church of England had been
placed on the same level as other Christian
denominations. Government funding of
religions would be allocated according to
the numbers in the congregations.
The Church’s monopoly on education
was abolished, opening up the education
system to other religious denominations
and to government-run schools.
LIBERAL CHANGES in Britain were
reflected in many of the legal improvements
made by Governor Bourke during his term.
Most importantly, during the year trial by
jury was at last extended to criminal cases
in New South Wales. Capital punishment
for forgery and stealing of livestock was
abolished in 
August
.
The police system was reorganised to
make it more professional. Officers now had
uniforms and badges to identify their ranks.
A beat system was introduced to provide
regular police patrols, particularly in settled
areas and towns.
THE CONCEPT of systematic colonisation
created in London by Edward Gibbon
Wakefield in 1829 continued to gain
supporters. Most enthusiastic of these was
Robert Gouger, who was now promoting a
new province called South Australia on the
southern coast.
Since Wakefield’s release from prison in
1830 various associations had been formed
to promote his ideas, although most had
collapsed. As news of Charles Sturt’s
explorations filtered through to England,
the South Australia idea revived in 1833. On
26 December
the South Australian
Association was formed by Gouger and
others to push the concept.
Other 
notable events
New South Wales
created the role of
Land Commissioner in
August
in a bid to
restrict squatting on
unsurveyed Crown land.
A large Sydney public
meeting on 
26 January
called on London to
grant the colony
responsible government.
Bathing in Sydney Cove
between 6.00 am and
8.00 pm was banned
by the government.
1833
Teams of savage dogs
were stationed across
Eaglehawk Neck at Port
Arthur to discourage
escape attempts
Off to Port Arthur
Church monopoly
Liberal changes
Wakefield dreams
32
background image
1834
Other 
notable events
On 
14 January
convict
servants Sarah
McGregor and Mary
Maloney murdered their
tyrannical master.
Their death sentences
were commuted to
three years in prison
after public protests.
Lieutenant-Governor of
Van Diemen’s Land,
George Arthur, created
the Port Puer station
on 
8 February
to
separate teenage
offenders from
hardened criminals.
Nine convicts were
shot dead during an
insurrection on Norfolk
island on 
15 January
.
Thirteen were hanged
in September.
Police and indigenous
peoples fought a battle
at Pinjarra in Western
Australia on
28 October
. Fourteen
Aborigines were killed.
pardon the six. Four immediately returned
to England.
BY THE 1830s most of the best agricultural
land in Van Diemen’s Land had been taken.
This increased pressure to allow settlement
across Bass Strait in the Port Phillip District
of what would become Victoria.
Unable to provide sufficient administrators
or surveyors for a new settlement, Governor
Bourke continued to resist. Undeterred, a
number of people decided to take mattters
into their own hands.
One family eyeing the rich and fertile
lands across the Strait was the Hentys.
They had originally immigrated to Western
Australia, but, finding it too inhospitable,
had moved on to Van Diemen’s Land. As
latecomers, the only land they could acquire
was very marginal.
Therefore, on 
19 November
Edward
Henty, in the ship 
Thistle, landed at Portland
Bay, a regular whalers stop west of Port
Phillip. There he set up a new settlement
and began shipping the family’s merino
flock across Bass Strait. The Hentys were
illegally squatting on Crown land, but there
was little the government in Sydney could
do to prevent it.
THE CONCEPT of the free province of
South Australia began to gather large
numbers of supporters. Encouraged by the
South Australian Association, the British
parliament passed the 
South Australia Act
1834 on 
15 August
.
Land would be sold at a minimum price
to those who could afford it. Funds generated
would be used to finance assisted passage
immigration for those who could not, but
who were needed as tradesmen and labourers.
Control of South Australia would be split
between the Colonial Office and the South
Australian Colonization Commission, with
Robert Gouger as Secretary.
ALTHOUGH THE formation of trade
unions in Britain was by this time legal,
many people were still determined to
suppress them. Six members of the Friendly
Society of Agricultural Labourers in Dorset
had sworn secret oaths of loyalty to support
one another in their struggle for better pay
and working contitions.
When they began agitating against plans
to reduce their wages, an employer had them
arrested for breaching an obscure 1797 law
against the swearing of secret oaths.
In 
March
they were found guilty by a
jury of landowners and a magistrate who
owned a factory that was also affected by
union agitation. Their sentence was seven
years transportation.
They arrived at Sydney on 
17 August
;
however, a petition signed by 800 000 people
in Britain helped force the government to
The illegal Henty settlement at Portland Bay
South Australia
Tolpuddle Martyrs
Illegal settlements
33
background image
1835
of a treaty with the local indigenous people
as a way of avoiding the conflict that marked
settler arrivals in other parts of the colony. 
On 
6 June
he met with Wurundjeri elders
and had them sign a document handing over
280 000 hectares of land in exchange for
goods worth no more than £100 [about
$10 000]. For this he secured a large slice of
what is today inner Melbourne.
Batman returned to Van Diemen’s Land
boasting he was the ‘greatest landowner in
the world’. Subsequent events quickly
brought him down to earth. Governor
Bourke repudiated the ‘treaty’ on
28 August
, saying it was Crown land which
was not the Wurundjeri’s to sell.
Illegal settlers in the Port Phillip district
were declared trespassers and ordered to
leave. Despite this, a trickle of settlers
continued to arrive in the Yarra River for
the rest of the year. Most prominent of these
was John Pascoe Fawkner.
PLANS FOR the new province of South
Australia continued. On 
8 February
ten
members were appointed to the South
Australian Colonization Commission,
including Robert Torrens as Chairman.
Their task was to raise £20 000 [about
$4 million] to fund the initial development
and then arrange pre-sales of land to the
value of £35 000 [about $7 million] to fund
assisted passages for workers and their
families. By 
December
the commissioners
had all but achieved their objectives.
A BITTER rivalry marked the relationship
between explorer Charles Sturt and Colonial
Surveyor Thomas Mitchell. On 
9 March
Mitchell set out from Boree Station near
Orange in a bid to prove Sturt wrong in his
claim that the Darling flowed into the
Murray River.
Mitchell followed the Bogan River to its
junction with the Darling, where he
established Fort Bourke on 
29 May
. From
there it was a long journey — 500 kilometres
south along the Darling to the site of
Menindee by 
8 June
. Despite being forced
to turn back by hostile Aborigines, Mitchell
now had to concede that Sturt was correct.
IN THE wake of the Hentys’ success in
establishing a base at Portland Bay, John
Batman and five Aboriginal men sailed from
Van Diemen’s Land to Port Phillip, arriving
on 
29 May
. Batman had conceived the idea
34
Sign here. Batman concludes his infamous
‘treaty’ with the Wurundjeri people.
John Bede Polding
Robert Torrens
Colonising SA
Mitchell versus Sturt
Batman’s ‘treaty’
background image
Other 
notable events
Most of the indigenous
people remaining in
Van Diemen’s Land
were sent to Flinders
Island in 
January
.
The Australian
Patriotic Association
was formed to fight for
representative
government for New
South Wales.
Australia’s first Catholic
Archbishop, John Bede
Polding, arrived on
13 September
.
A bounty system for
immigrants was
introduced on
28 October
. Settlers
were paid an amount
of money equal to the
fare from England for
each immigrant they
sponsored.
35
Thomas Mitchell (on horse) is greeted by the
Hentys at their Portland Bay settlement
1836
COLONIAL SURVEYOR Thomas Mitchell
embarked on 
17 March
on the expedition
that would make him famous. His party
followed the Lachlan River south to the
point where it joined the Murrumbidgee on
12 May
.
From there they went west to the
Murray, following it to its junction with the
Darling. Along the way they were opposed
Mitchell explores
background image
Other 
notable events
Charles Darwin arrived
at Sydney in
HMS Beagle on
12 January
.
A wooden-railed
tramway powered by
running convicts was
established at Port
Arthur in Van Diemen’s
Land on 
16 March
.
All Christian
denominations were
placed on an equal
footing on 
29 July
, with
state aid being provided
according to the sizes
of their congregations.
Governor Bourke
granted grazing rights
to squatters beyond
the Limits of Location
on 
1 October
.
by local indigenous peoples defending their
traditional lands. This culminated in a
battle at Mount Dispersion, where seven
Aborigines were killed.
After a brief foray north along the Darling,
Mitchell decided he would be better served
by following the Murray. After heading east
to its junction with the Loddon River, on
20 June
the party turned south.
They then marched through an area of
great agricultural promise, so much so that
Mitchell named it Australia Felix (from the
Latin for ‘happy’ or ‘lucky’). Skirting around
the waterless Mallee region, he followed the
Glenelg River to the coast at Discovery Bay.
From there they headed north-east until
they saw smoke from campfires at Portland
Bay. Upon investigating, on 
29 August
Mitchell met with the Henty brothers who
had crossed from Van Diemen’s Land the
previous year.
By 
3 November
he was back in Sydney
reporting to the Governor on his many
discoveries. The regions he had explored
would soon become some of the most
valuable agricultural lands on the continent.
CAPTAIN JOHN Hindmarsh was appointed
Governor of South Australia, and John Hurtle
Fisher was to be Resident Commissioner. In
what would prove a recipe for disaster, they
were expected to administer the new
province on an equal basis.
Well before the two men left England,
the first settlers were on their way to South
Australia. They landed at the South Australia
Company’s whaling station on Kangaroo
Island, to await the arrival of the officials who
would decide the location of the settlement.
Hindmarsh, sailing in HMS
Buffalo,
arrived at Holdfast Bay in Gulf St Vincent
and, on 
28 December
, proclaimed the new
province of South Australia at Glenelg.
On 
31 December
Colonel William Light,
the province’s surveyor, chose an inland site
for the town of Adelaide, upsetting Hindmarsh
who wanted it to be on the coast.
GOVERNOR BOURKE wanted a
completely new education system for New
South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land, based
on the Irish National system. He began
establishing schools that provided a good
basic education. Previously, all schooling
had been provided by religious bodies,
mostly the Church of England.
To placate the churches, Bourke permitted
weekly religious instruction classes in
government schools. Although supported by
Catholic Bishop Polding on 
3 August
, it
was opposed by protestant denominations,
which threatened to derail the entire project.
REALISING HE could not halt the rush of
settlers to Port Phillip, Governor Bourke
declared the region open for settlement on
9 September
. Captain William Lonsdale
arrived in the Yarra River on 
29 September
with soldiers, surveyors and customs
officials to set up an administration. He took
on the roles of military commander, civil
administrator, magistrate and protector of
Aborigines. Work began on surveying a
township and preparing land for sale.
36
Captain John Hindmarsh
Captain William Lonsdale’s cottage
at the Port Phillip settlement
The convict-powered
tramway at Port Arthur
South Australia begins
Bourke’s education plan
Port Phillip settled
background image
37
Settlers began flooding in from Van
Diemen’s Land to take advantage of the first
land sales on 
1 June
. Much of the space
between the Yarra and Port Phillip Bay was
quickly occupied. Before long settlers were
moving out of Melbourne to take up land in
the highly fertile regions around the Loddon,
Goulburn and Campaspe rivers.
IN LONDON there were moves to investigate
the efficiency of transportation as a
punishment. It was to be considered from
the points of view of cost and how it
worked as a deterrent to criminals in Britain.
The Select Committee on Transportation
was established by the House of Commons
on 
7 April
. Headed by Sir Adrian Molesworth,
Other 
notable events
The Australian Gas
Light Company was
formed by royal charter
on 
7 September
.
News of the death of
King William IV and the
succession of Queen
Victoria reached Sydney
on 
8 October
.
An overland mail
service using coaches
and packhorses was
established between
Sydney and Melbourne
on 
30 December
.
COLONEL LIGHT began surveying his
chosen site for Adelaide on 
11 January
. He
was under considerable pressure, as many
settlers who had already paid for their land
were arriving steadily and expecting to take
up residence.
The first town blocks became available
in 
March
, but it was to be some time before
rural blocks were surveyed and ready for
occupation. Light’s visionary plan for Adelaide
included a grid pattern of streets and squares
bounded by four terraces.
ONCE CAPTAIN Lonsdale had established
his base at Port Phillip, Governor Bourke
sailed south to examine the site, which
already had more than 200 residents. On
1 March
he confirmed Robert Hoddle’s plan
for the village, which was to be named after
British Prime Minister Lord Melbourne.
1837
Colonel William Light,
the creator of Adelaide
Creating Adelaide
Melbourne confirmed
Select Committee
Settlers camp in tents 
on the site of Adelaide
background image
1838
Norfolk Island or Van Diemen’s Land. The
committee recommended that transportation
be abolished, setting the stage for the
eventual ending of convicts being sent to
the Australian colonies.
ALTHOUGH GOVERNOR Gipps was
committed to the welfare of the indigenous
peoples, he found himself fighting a losing
battle. There was constant conflict between
Aborigines and European settlers as they
moved further inland.
Often, when indigenous opposition proved
a major hurdle to settlement, unscrupulous
landholders and squatters resorted to
murdering Aborigines to clear them from
the properties.
This reached a shocking low on 
9 June
with the Myall Creek Massacre. Indigenous
people had been resisting encroachment of
the Europeans by spearing their cattle and
sheep. Myall Creek stockmen retaliated by
GOVERNOR GEORGE Gipps arrived in
New South Wales on 
24 February
, taking
up his duties immediately as his predecessor
had already departed. He was another Army
officer — one who was accustomed to
obeying orders and not inclined to rock the
boat. This suited the exclusives and
ultraconservatives very well, although they
soon became upset and confused by his
occasional liberalism.
IN BRITAIN the Molesworth Select
Committee on Transportation reported on
3 August
. After considerable research and
interviewing many witnesses, the members
concluded that the system was not working
as it was intended, especially as a deterrent
to crime in Britain.
They found many convicts preferred death
to continuing imprisonment in places like
Other 
notable events
David Jones opened
his new drapery store
in Sydney.
The Sydney Botanic
Gardens were opened
to the public.
it would have a profound effect on the
future of the Australian colonies.
THE OLD problem of exclusives versus
emancipists caused the downfall of Bourke’s
governorship. In 1835 he refused Campbell
Riddell, the Colonial Treasurer, permission
to stand for election as Chairman of the
Petty Sessions [magistrates court] because
of his lack of legal training.
Riddell, an exclusive, defied the
Governor and defeated Bourke’s nominee
in the subsequent election. In retaliation
Bourke excluded Riddell from his Executive
Council, but was overruled by Secretary
of State for the Colonies, Lord Glenelg.
Believing his honour and principles
were at stake, on 
30 January
Bourke sent
his resignation to Glenelg, who accepted
it on 
3 July
. Bourke departed Sydney on
5 December
to the disappointment of
many who regarded him as one of the
great governors. He had done much to
improve the education system and promote
a vision for New South Wales as a colony
of free settlers.
38
Myall Creek
Bourke resigns
Molesworth reports
Gipps is Governor
Governor George Gipps
Queen Victoria with her
consort, Prince Albert
background image
IN
FEBRUARY
Governor Gipps introduced
a new scheme whereby squatters on Crown
land would pay a fixed licence fee plus a
variable fee based on the numbers of
livestock they were maintaining on the land.
Squatters were people who had moved
on to unsurveyed Crown land in the hope
that they could eventually take possession
murdering and burning the bodies of 22
Aboriginal men, women and children.
Eleven of the murderers were brought to
trial; however, they were acquitted on a
technicality on 
29 November
. Gipps ordered
a retrial in which seven were found guilty
on 
5 December
and hanged on 
18 December
.
WITHIN TWO years the grand
Wakefieldian experiment in South Australia
was in trouble. Rural blocks of land had
finally became available in 
May
. Soon the
main preoccupation of settlers was the buying
and selling of land rather than the
development of the agriculture the province
needed to survive.
The joint administration by Governor
and Resident Commissioner was doomed to
failure from the start. Unrelenting conflict
between Hindmarsh and Fisher forced the
Colonial Office to dismiss them both on
14 July
. Their roles were combined when
Lieutenant George Gawler became Governor
on 
12 October
.
MOST IMMIGRATION to the colonies
until this time was from Britain and Ireland.
It began to change when German Lutherans
arrived to escape persecution in their
homeland. A group of missionaries took up
residence at Nundah in the Moreton Bay
settlement in 
March
.
On 
18 November
more than 200 refugees
from Germany arrived in South Australia,
led by Pastor Augustus Kavel. They were
sponsored by George Angas, a director of
the South Australian Company, who realised
their farming expertise would be of great
benefit to the province.
Land changes
39
1839
German immigration
South Australian trouble
Convicts labour in 
Van Diemen’s Land
German immigrants in
South Australia
background image
when the surveyors caught up. The minimum
price for surveyed Crown land at auction
was increased from five to twelve shillings
per acre [0.4 hectare].
THE AMERICAN presence in New South
Wales was enhanced on 
15 January
when
J H Williams became consul for the USA,
based in Sydney. Being a colony, all of New
South Wales’ official diplomatic relations
were conducted through London.
Another American presence took locals
by surprise on 
29 November
. Overnight
two US Navy frigates arrived and dropped
anchor, undetected, in Sydney Cove. Their
discovery at dawn the next day caused
panic in the town. Commanded by Captain
Charles Wilkes, they were on a peaceful
scientific expedition.
As a result of this undetected arrival, the
government ordered the construction of
Fort Denison on the island of Pinchgut for
permanent monitoring of all arrivals and
departures, day and night.
BY THIS time, with the area around Adelaide
well established, there was considerable
interest in exploring inland areas of South
Australia. Edward Eyre was a pioneer of the
overland droving of cattle from New South
Wales to the province. He led an expedition
north to the Flinders Range and Lake Torrens
on 
1 May
, beginning the opening up of the
region to limited grazing and agriculture.
Other 
notable events
John Hutt became
Governor of Western
Australia on 
3 January
.
The boundaries of New
South Wales were
expanded on 
15 June
to include the New
Zealand islands.
The first shipload of
assisted immigrants
arrived at Port Phillip
on 
27 October
.
west to make his way to Melbourne by
April
. He would not have survived if he had
not had an Aboriginal companion who knew
where to find food.
OCCASIONALLY, NOT all convicts sent
to the Australian colonies were criminals.
On 
26 February
HMS
Buffalo arrived at Port
Jackson with 58 French-Canadian political
prisoners. All had been sentenced to
transportation for playing active parts in the
Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837–38. They
PAUL DE Strzelecki, a former Prussian
soldier, came to New South Wales via London
and North America. He had been involved
in some minor explorations around Sydney.
In 
January
he set out from Sydney to
explore the region south from the Monaro
Plains, near where Canberra is today. He
moved up through the high plains to the
Australian Alps. There he found a mountain
that he calculated to be the highest on the
continent, and which he named after Polish
democracy leader Tadeusz Kosciuszko.
He then embarked on a difficult trek south
through rough, mountainous and heavily
vegetated country, gradually abandoning his
horses and equipment to proceed on foot.
Strzelecki eventually reached the south
coast in the Gippsland region before turning
1840
40
Paul de Strzelecki
American invasion
Political exiles
Exploring with Eyre
Strzelecki goes south
background image
The Monaro country
explored by Strzelecki
Other 
notable events
A meeting was held in
Melbourne on 
5 May
to agitate for Port
Phillip’s separation
from New South Wales.
A mass meeting was
held in Sydney on
28 September
to
protest changes to the
Masters and Servants Act.
The Adelaide Municipal
Corporation became
the first local
government in Australia
during 
August
.
were put to work on roadbuilding and other
construction projects. The Canada Bay area
of Sydney is named for them.
AS A result of the Molesworth Committee’s
report on transportation, major changes were
made to the system of sending convicts to
Australia. Anyone sentenced to jail for seven
years or less would serve their time in Britain,
Gibraltar or Bermuda. Those sentenced to
more than seven years would be sent to Van
Diemen’s Land or Norfolk Island.
On 
22 May
an Order in Council officially
abolished transportation to New South
Wales, although this was not the end of the
story. The transport ship 
Eden brought what
was supposed to be the last convicts to
Sydney on 
18 November
.
OVER DECADES Norfolk Island had
developed a reputation for brutal, even
sadistic, treatment of its inmates. When he
was appointed in 
February
, Captain
Alexander Maconochie, with the approval
of the Colonial Office, introduced a new,
humane regime to the settlement.
Convicts had their sentences shortened
if they were well behaved, and could earn
points for hard work. Most people, including
Governor Gipps, were sceptical about the
likelihood of success.
41
1841
AFTER VARIOUS explorations around the
Eyre Peninsula region north of Port Lincoln,
Edward Eyre set out on what would be his
greatest journey on 
25 February
. His aim
was to cross the continent, following the
line of the Great Australian Bight to King
George’s Sound.
With his long-time colleague John Baxter
and three Aborigines, Eyre struggled through
the arid landscape. On 
29 April
two of the
Aborigines murdered Baxter and fled with
most of the provisions. Eyre and the other
Aborigine, Wylie, continued west, battling
hunger and thirst.
After a month of privation they had the
good luck to reach Rossiter Bay and find a
French whaling ship at anchor. Reinvigorated,
after seven days they again struck west in
cold and wet weather, staggering into the
King George’s Sound settlement on
7 July
.
Edward Eyre
Ending transportation?
Humane Norfolk Island
Eyre across the Bight
background image
FOR SEVERAL years Caroline Chisholm
had been working to alleviate the problems
faced by immigrant women. She formulated
the idea of a women’s home in Sydney where
women could stay until they found work
and accommodation.
She presented her idea to Governor Gipps,
but came up against colonial officials who
presented every possible objection and
obstruction. None was accustomed to a
determined woman chasing her ideals. As
she was a convert to Catholicism, her ideas
were often characterised as some sort of
Catholic plot — although exactly what, no
one knew.
Eventually, in 
December
, Gipps
succumbed to her pressure by allocating a
section of the Immigration Barracks. She
established the Female Immigrants’ Home
with a free employment bureau where
people could attend to select domestic
workers. Without any official funding, the
entire project was dependent on Chisholm’s
personal financial support and money she
raised from donors.
ON 
15 MAY
George Grey became Governor
of South Australia, replacing George Gawler.
He took over at a time when the province
was effectively bankrupt. It was unable to
pay its way as Wakefield had originally
conceived, probably because the land was
being sold too cheaply.
When Grey assumed office the British
government provided a £220 000 [about
$40 million] bail-out package. Because of
this South Australia lost its status as a province
and became a Crown colony under direct
control of the Colonial Office in London.
Other 
notable events
The first gas street
lighting in Australia
was turned on in
Sydney on 
24 May
.
Assignment of convict
labour to private
employers in New
South Wales was
abolished on 
1 July
.
Britain suspended the
bounty system of
immigration on 
1 July
due to questions of
mismanagement.
Police and settlers
killed around 50
Aborigines in a battle
at Rufis River in the
south-west of New
South Wales.
Edward Eyre meets the
French whaling captain 
at Rossiter Bay
Despite its financial
troubles, Adelaide was
bustling by the 1840s
Governor George Grey
42
Saving South Australia
Caroline Chisholm
Caroline Chisholm
background image
Right: Sydney at the time of
the municipal elections
43
The colonial government fiercely resisted
such moves, not wanting to see the Crown
colony turned into a penal colony. It did,
however, permit the arrival of 12–15-year-old
convict boys who were apprenticed to local
employers. The first of the Parkhurst
Apprentices, named for the prison in London,
arrived on 
27 August
.
MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENTS were
gradually being established, with Adelaide
first. In the first popular election held in the
colony, John Hosking became Mayor of
Sydney on 
1 November
. Melbourne followed
on 
1 December
, electing a council, with Henry
Condell sworn in as Mayor on 
9 December
.
Other 
notable events
Andrew Petrie found
and named the Mary
River, north of
Brisbane, on 
17 May
.
The Imperial Waste Lands
Act 1842 was passed
on 
22 June
, raising
the land price to £1
per acre (0.4 hectare).
1842
THE NOTORIOUS Moreton Bay settlement
was proclaimed open to free settlement by
Governor Gipps on 
10 February
. Free settlers
had been arriving in the surrounding regions
via the Darling Downs for some years, but
the Brisbane area remained for convicts only.
Officially, transportation directly to
Moreton Bay ended in 1839; however, demand
for convict labour continued. As agitation
against landing convicts in Sydney and
Melbourne grew, numerous ships were
diverted to Moreton Bay.
THE WESTERN Australia colony continued
its struggle to become established. Many
settlers were now calling on Britain to begin
convict transportation to supply much-
needed labour.
By the 1840s Melbourne had
become well established
and was growing steadily
Parkhurst Apprentices
Municipal elections
Moreton Bay is free
Above: An immigration hostel in Brisbane
background image
were exacerbated by falling prices for
livestock and wool.
The problems spread to the banking
sector. On 
1 April
the Bank of Australia
failed, followed closely by the Sydney
Banking Company and the Port Phillip Bank.
All closed their doors owing large amounts
to depositors.
With more than 600 people declared
bankrupt during the year, further changes
were needed. On 
15 September
new
legislation abolished imprisonment for debt,
and permitted graziers to borrow money on
the security of their future wool production.
AUSTRALIND, IN the Swan River colony,
had been established in 1840 as a place to
breed horses for export to India. The name
was a combination of Australia and India.
The settlement had been created along
the lines advanced by Edward Gibbon
Wakefield. With a grant of more than
40 000 hectares, Australind had attracted
settlers. But it never worked financially and
was finally abandoned in 
December
.
A NEW constitution came into effect for
New South Wales on
1 January
as a result
of legislation passed by the British parliament.
This was the first tangible step on the road
to responsible government that so many
were agitating for.
A new Legislative Council was created
with two-thirds of its members elected and
the rest appointed by the Governor. To
qualify to vote in the election a person had to
be male and had to own land. This effectively
excluded more than 70 per cent of the male
population, and all of the female.
Those who were successful at the first
election, held on 
15 June
, were all highly
influential in the colony. They included
William C Wentworth, Hannibal Macarthur,
William Lawson, Alexander Macleay and
John Dunmore Lang. The elected members
were all businessmen, merchants or graziers.
Alexander Macleay was elected Speaker at
the first meeting  on 
1 August
.
SINCE 1840 Governor Gipps had struggled
with financial problems caused by the issuing
of bounty orders for immigrants worth a
huge amount of money. There were guarantees
that the government would pay the equivalent
of an immigrant’s fare to the colonies.
So many bounty orders had been issued
that, if they were all presented, the colonial
economy would collapse. Gipps’s efforts to
solve the problem led to more problems that
Alexander Macleay
44
1843
Other 
notable events
Riots at the Female
Factory at Parramatta
on 
1 February
resulted
in 80 arrests.
On 
15 July
Britain
resumed assisted
passages for
immgrants to the
Australian colonies.
The South Australian
Legislative Council
met on 
10 October
for
the first time.
Monetary confusion
New constitution
Australind collapses
background image
45
Other 
notable events
Norfolk Island was
officially annexed to
Van Diemen’s Land on
29 September
.
A public meeting held
in Melbourne on
28 November
called
for separation from
New South Wales.
1844
resented being forced to pay to use Crown
land. They had occupied it for free for so
long that they had come to see it as a right.
There were protest meetings in Sydney
on 
9 April
and Melbourne on
1 June
, and a
Pastoralists Association was formed. Those
influential squatters with associates in
London began a campaign to discredit the
Governor in the Colonial Office.
CHARLES STURT departed
Adelaide on 
10 August
for his last
great expedition. He took 15 men,
six drays, a boat and 200 sheep on
his search for an inland sea.
The party trekked along the
Murray, then north up the Darling
to establish a base at Lake Cawndilla.
Within two months many of the
expeditioners were sick and water
was running short.
Even so, Sturt persisted, making
a new base at Depot Glen. Although
they now had supplies of water, the
expedition was trapped for months
by a drought in surrounding regions.
FEW PEOPLE in the government
trusted Ludwig Leichhardt. He was
seen as an adventurer who was
very good at extracting money from
friends and supporters, even for his
wildest schemes.
When the government declined
to back his proposal for a major
ILLEGAL OCCUPATION of unsurveyed
Crown land by squatters was a constant
problem for Governor Gipps. Individuals
could only occupy Crown land in return for
the payment of a ‘quit rent’, a sort of land tax.
Gipps began enforcing quit rents on 
2 April
to fund a major new immigration program.
The tightening of the occupation
requirements outraged the squatters, who
New squatting rules
Into the north-west
Sturt goes north
One of the more prosperous
squatter properties
background image
AFTER 15 MONTHS of travelling across
country, Ludwig Leichhardt’s expedition
finally arrived at Port Essington [Darwin] on
17 December
. It had been a long and gruelling
journey; one of the expeditioners had been
killed by Aborigines. 
The trek did, however, open up vast areas
of land never before seen by Europeans.
Other 
notable events
Thomas Mitchell
departed from Orange
on his last expedition
in 
December
.
inland expedition, Leichhardt turned to
private investors who, as usual, were happy
to fund him.
He sailed north from Sydney to Moreton
Bay, arriving on 
13 August
. From there he
made his way up to the Darling Downs and
Jimbour Station, then the outer limit of
settlement. The expedition departed Jimbour
on 
1 October
on an epic journey, the longest
ever undertaken by explorers in Australia to
that time.
BRITAIN HAD officially ended transportation
of convicts to New South Wales, but the
British prison population continued to
expand. Rather than build new jails at home,
the government invented a new category of
convicts called ‘exiles’. These were criminals
who had served most of their sentences in
England. It was expected that, once they
reached New South Wales, they would be
set free.
This fooled nobody when the first exiles
arrived on 
16 November
. Transport ships
carrying exiles were met by protests in Sydney
and Melbourne. Anti-transportationists
gathered on the wharves in an attempt to
prevent the ships landing their human cargo.
As the opponents became more militant, it
was easier simply to divert the ships to
Moreton Bay where there was still a strong
demand for convict labour.
46
1845
An illustration depicts
indigenous warriors
preparing to attack
Leichhardt’s party
Transporting exiles
Leichhardt successes
background image
In 1835
US President Andrew
Jackson survived an
assassination attempt on
30 January
.
Charles Darwin visited the
Galapagos Islands on
7 September
in HMS Beagle.
In 1836
On 
17 March
the Republic
of Texas abolished the
slave trade.
In 1837
Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist
was first published in serial
form in 
February
.
On 
20 June
Victoria
became Queen of Great
Britain following the death
of William IV.
Anti-British rebellions broke
out in Upper and Lower
Canada during
November–December
.
In 1838
The revolutionary People’s
Charter was first published
in Britain during 
May
.
People of the Cherokee
nation began their forced
relocation in the USA on
26 May
.
Queen Victoria was crowned
on 
28 June
.
In 1839
The world’s first electric
telegraph line was initiated in
Britain on 
9 April
.
The First Opium War
between Britain and China
erupted during 
August
.
Michael Faraday published
his thesis clarifying the true
nature of electricity.
In 1840
On 
10 January
Britain
inaugurated the first penny
postal system.
In New Zealand the Treaty
of Waitangi, between Maori
and the British, was signed
on 
6 February
.
Ottoman and British troops
launched an attack on
Egyptian forces in Beirut on
10 September
.
In 1841
Britain officially occupied
Hong Kong on 
26 January
.
On 
10 February
the British
North American Act was
proclaimed to unite Upper
and Lower Canada.
In 1842
Dr Crawford Long used
anaesthesia in a medical
operation for the first time.
All women and boys under
ten were prohibited from
working in British mines on
10 August
.
In 1843
The first commercial
Christmas cards were
published in Britain.
In Barbados on 
6 June
,
Samuel Prescod was the
first non-European elected
to the House of Assembly.
In 1844
The Dominican Republic
secured its independence
from Haiti on 
27 February
.
Samuel Morse sent the first
electrical telegram from
Washington DC to Baltimore
on 
24 May
.
In 1845
The Great Irish Famine
began in 
February
, when
Potato Blight infected crops.
Moves began to annex the
Republic of Texas as a
state of the USA.
Around the world
Leichhardt, seen by many as a con man,
would now be treated as a hero — for a
while, at least.
CHARLES STURT’S expedition arrived at
Depot Glen on 
27 January
, where it was
forced to camp for six months to await rain.
He began exploring once again in 
July
,
and by 
August
was contemplating the vast
emptiness of the Simpson Desert. After
450 kilometres it forced him to retreat. He
also found the main stream of Cooper Creek
in 
September
.
Once it became obvious that there was
no inland sea, Sturt was talked out of yet
another foray west. Suffering from scurvy,
he had to be carried back to Adelaide, with
the expedition relying largely on Aboriginal
food sources.
47
Sturt contemplates the
fearsome grandeur of 
the Simpson Desert
The settlement at Port
Essington, where
Leichhardt finally 
arrived in December
Sturt’s problems
48
3rd Regiment (Buffs)  19
46th Regiment  8
73rd Regiment  2
Adelaide  37
Agriculture  20
Allman, Francis  16
Angas, George  39
Anti-transportation movement
41, 46
Arthur, George  25
Assisted passage immigration  44
Atkins, Richard  3
Australia, name  12
Australia Felix  36
Australian Agricultural Company
20, 30
Australian Alps  40
Australind  44
Bank of Australia  25
Bank of New South Wales  12
Banking failures  44
Bannister, Saxe  20
Bathurst  9
Bathurst Plains  9
Bathurst, Lord  6, 11, 14, 18, 24
Batman, John  34
Baxter, John  41
Bent, Ellis  10
Bent, Jeffery  8, 10, 11, 12
Bigge, Johns Thomas  14, 15, 16,
18, 19
Black line  29
Blaxcell, Garnham  4
Blaxland, Gregory  7
Bligh, William  2, 5
Blue Mountains  6, 7, 8
Bogan River  34
Bounty system  42
Bourke, Richard  30, 33, 36, 37, 38
Brisbane River  20, 22
Brisbane, Thomas  16, 18, 21, 22
Broughton, William  11
Campbell River  7
Campbelltown  4
Canadian exiles  40
Capital punishment  32
Castlereagh  4
Castlereagh, Lord  3, 5
Castlereagh River  14
Catholic Church  12
Censorship  24
Charters of Justice  8, 19
Chisholm, Caroline  42
Christianity  36
Church and Schools Corporation
23
Church of England  3, 32
Church schools  23
Coal mining  20
Collins, David  4
Colonial Office  14, 16, 24
Colonial Secretary  23
Colonisation schemes  28
Constitutional changes  44
Convict escapes  7
Cooper Creek  47
Corio Bay  21
Courts  8
Cox, William  9
Criminal Court  20
Crossley, George  10
Crown lands  34, 45
Cumberland Plains  7
Cunningham, Allan  19, 24
Darling, Ralph  22, 23, 24, 30
Darling Downs  24
Darling River  27
Davey, Thomas  5
Depot Glen  45, 47
Discipline  23
Douglass, Henry  18
Eagar, Edward  10
Eaglehawk Neck  29
Education  23, 32, 36
Emancipation  3
Emancipists  13, 16, 18, 38
Epidemics  25
Evans, George  6, 7, 8, 14
Exclusives  38
Exiles  46
Eyre, Edward  40, 41
Fawkner, John Pascoe  8, 34
Female convicts  17
Female Factory  17
Female immigration  31, 42
Field, Barron  12
Fish River  7
Fisher, John Hurtle  36
Flinders, Matthew  2, 8
Flinders Range  40
Forbes, Francis  20, 24
Fort Bourke  34
Gawler, George  39
Gellibrand, Joseph  20
German immigration  39
Gipps, George  38, 39, 41, 42, 43, 44
Gippsland  40
Glenelg  36
Glenelg, Lord  38
Gore, William  3
Gouger, Robert  32
Goulburn, Frederick  16, 22
Governor’s Court  10
Greenway, Francis  11, 13, 15, 17, 18
Grey, George  42
Hall, Edward  24
Hall, James  18
Henty, Edward  33
Hindmarsh, John  36
HMS
Buffalo 36
HMS
Porpoise,  3
Hobart  5, 22
Hovell, William  21
Hume River  21
Hume, Hamilton  21, 27
Humpybong  21
Hunter River  20
Hutt, John  40
Hyde Park Barracks  15
Illawarra  6
Illegal settlements  33
Immigration  21, 31, 39, 42
Imperial Waste Lands Act 1842 43
Indigenous relations  11, 25, 29,
34, 38
Irish convicts  14
Irish immigrants  31
Johnston, George  3, 5
Jury trials  25
Kangaroo Island  36
Kavel, Augustus  39
King George’s Sound  41
Lachlan River  12, 27, 35
Lake Alexandrina  29
Lake Cawndilla  45
Lake Torrens  40
Land Commissioner  32
Land grants  1
Land sales  21, 23, 30, 33, 39
Lawson, William  7
Legal system  8, 19, 20
Legislative Council  19, 20, 23, 25,
44
Leichhardt, Ludwig  45, 46
Liberalism  32
Light, William  36, 37
Limits of settlement  23, 27
Liverpool Plains  24
Liverpool Ranges  19
Loddon River  36
Logan, Patrick  23
Lonsdale, William  36, 37
Macarthur, John  5, 12, 17, 19
Macleay, Alexander  23, 44
Maconochie, Alexander  41
Macquarie, Elizabeth  6
Macquarie, Lachlan  1, 2, 4, 6, 8,
11, 12, 15, 16, 17
Macquarie Harbour  17, 29, 32
Macquarie River  7
Macquarie Tower  11
Maps –
Australia 1843  44
New South Wales 1810  2
New South Wales 1825  22
Nineteen Counties  28
Maps – exploration  7, 14, 19, 21,
24, 28, 35, 40, 42, 45, 46
Marriage  3
Marsden, Samuel  5, 11, 13, 18
Melbourne  37, 40, 43
Melville Island  28
Methodist Church  10
Miller, Henry  21
Mitchell, Thomas  28, 34, 35, 46
Molesworth, Adrian  37, 41
Molle, George  8
Monaro Plains  40
Monetary confusion  44
Moral standards  3
Moreton Bay  21, 22, 43
Mount Blaxland  7
Mount Kosciuszko  40
Mount York  7
Municipal government  43
Murray River  29, 36
Murrumbidgee River  21, 27, 29
Myall Creek massacre  38
New England Tablelands  24
New settlements  4
New South Wales  44
New South Wales Corps  2
Nineteen Counties  27
Norfolk Island  2, 9, 23, 41, 45
O’Flynn, Jeremiah  12
Oxley, John  6, 12, 14, 20
Pamphlett, Thomas  20
Pandora’s Pass  19
Parkhurst Apprentices  43
Parliamentary inquiries  6
Pastoralists’ Association  45
Paterson, William  3
Pedder, John  20
Petrie, Andrew  43
Pitt Town  4
Polding, John Bede  36
Political convicts  33, 40
Port Arthur  29, 32
Port Curtis  20
Port Essington  46
Port Macquarie  16
Port Phillip  1, 33, 36
Port Puer  33
Portland Bay  33
Postal system  25
Punishments  23
Rehabilitation policies  4
Religion  7
Richmond  4
Riddell, Campbell  38
Riley, Alexander  4
Ripon Regulations  30
Roads  5, 8
Rossiter Bay  41
Royal commissions  14, 18
Royal Navy  9
Rum Hospital  4, 11
Rumsby, Ann  18
Sarah Island  17
Select Committee on
Transportation  37
Simpson Desert  47
Sorrel, William  12, 17
South Australia  33, 34, 36, 39, 42
South Australia Act 1834 33
South Australia Company  36
South Australian Association  32
South Australian Colonization
Commission  33
Squatters  1, 32, 36, 39, 45
St Matthew’s Church  13
Stirling, James  24, 27, 30
Strzelecki, Paul de  40
Sturt, Charles  27, 29, 34, 45, 47
Sudds, Joseph  23
Suffrage  44
Supreme Court  8, 12, 20
Swan River  27, 31, 44
Thompson, Andrew  4
Thompson, Patrick  23
Tolpuddle Martyrs  33
Torrens, Robert  34
Transportation  6
Transportation changes  41
Transportation inquiries  37, 38
Van Diemen’s Land  1, 5, 8, 10, 17,
20, 22, 32, 33, 37, 41
Voting rights  44
Wakefield, Edward Gibbon  28,
32, 44
Warrumbungle Ranges  14
Wentworth, D’Arcy  10
Wentworth, William C  5, 24, 30
Western Australia  31, 43
Westernport  21, 23
Wilberforce  4
Windsor  4
Wurundjeri people  34
Wylde, John  11
Wylie  41
Yarra River  36
Index
2
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
47
46
To go to a specific
page, click on the
appropriate coloured
box down the centre